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Since I am new to the constructor topic, I have a small confusion of why we are using it? Is there any difference between declaring a constructor and not declaring it?

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closed as not a real question by Richard J. Ross III, Andrew Whitaker, M42, Jon Egerton, Jeff Jan 25 '13 at 16:10

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1  
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  lc. Jan 25 '13 at 6:49
2  
Constructors (C# Programming Guide) –  phoog Jan 25 '13 at 6:52
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4 Answers

Constructor is used to initialize the class object. If you don't declare/define it, then a default constructor would be created for you.

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There's no difference between declaring a public parameterless constructor which simply calls the base class's public parameterless constructor:

public class Test
{
    public Test() : base() {}
}

is equivalent to:

public class Test
{
}

The compiler supplies a default constructor for you.

(And the base() part is implicit; if you don't explicitly chain to another constructor, the compiler will treat it as if you'd tried to chain to the parameterless base class constructor1.)

But that doesn't mean that constructors are useless... you would usually put code in there. Typically it copies parameters:

public class Test
{
    private readonly string name;

    public Test(string name)
    {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

... but constructors can mostly contain the same code as normal methods. It's worth being aware that while your constructor is running, the object may not be fully initialized though, as the constructor bodies for derived classes won't have executed yet. It's advisable not to call virtual methods within a constructor for this reason.

See section 10.11 of the C# 5 spec for details of instance constructors in general, and section 10.11.4 for details of default constructors.


1 More specifically, it will chain as if you'd written base(). If there's no parameterless constructor, but there is a constructor whose parameters are all optional, that will be called.

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If you don't declare any constructor, the compiler will generate the default constructor with no parameter.

Consider this class :

public Class X
{
    public int A { get; set; }
}

No constructor declaration in there, so the compiler will put default constructor in that class like this :

public Class X
{
    public int A { get; set; }

    public X () 
    { 
    }

}

If you declare constructor in your class, the default constructor will not be generated.

public Class X
{
    public int A { get; set; }

    public X (int a) 
    { 
          // do something
    }

}

In this sample, the default empty constructor will not be generated. If you try to create an instance like this :

X obj = new X();

It will generate compilation error.

More detail : Default constructors, Constructor in C#

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Constructors are used for many thing for a class.

  1. If you want to do something on initialization of instance of class.

     public class MyClass
     {
         private string myWork = string.Empty;
         public MyClass()
         {
             myWork = "Started";
         }
      }
    
  2. If you want to limitize the scope for object creation of class

    public class MyClass
    {
        private string myWork = string.Empty;
        protected MyClass() 
        {
            myWork = "Started";
        }
    }
    

There are many other things like base class support and others. Please search on MSDN also.

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