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For example, if data in an external text file is like this:

45.78   67.90   87
34.89   346     0.98

How can I read this text file and assign each number to a variable in c++? Using ifstream, I am able to open the text file and assign first number to a variable, but I don't know how to read the next number after the spaces.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;
int main ()
{
    float a;
    ifstream myfile;
    myfile.open ("data.txt");
    myfile>>a;
    cout<<a;
    myfile.close();
    system ("pause");
    return 0;
}


#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;
int main ()
{int data[6],a,b,c,d,e,f;
ifstream myfile;
myfile.open ("a.txt");
for (int i=0;i<<6;i++)
{
    myfile>>data[i];
    }
myfile.close();
a=data[0];
b=data[1];
c=data[2];
d=data[3];
e=data[4];
f=data[5];
cout<<a<<"\t"<<b<<"\t"<<c<<"\t"<<d<<"\t"<<e<<"\t"<<f<<"\n";
system ("pause");
return 0;}
share|improve this question
    
Your text file contains floats, but you try to read them into int array (). That won't work as you expect. The question is very unclear, what are you trying to achieve? Maybe write your input and output you expect to be returned. –  Spook Jan 25 '13 at 8:37
    
And accept answers, if they actually solve your problem :) People rarely look into answered questions to provide more help. –  Spook Jan 25 '13 at 8:38
    
@Spook : the simple description of my problem is " A text file contains numbers in 100 rows * 100 columns (for example). Now i want my program to pick up ,for example , one number from 60th row and 97th column and then assign this value to a variable and perform some calculation with this variable. So i want to pick up some random numbers from a text file which contains a lot of numbers. how can i do that ?? thanks for patient replies :) –  Usman Naseer Jan 25 '13 at 9:15
    
At last! That's what we were waiting for :) I'll modify my answer shortly. –  Spook Jan 25 '13 at 10:19
    
thanks. It was really helpful !! –  Usman Naseer Jan 25 '13 at 12:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Repeat >> reads in loop.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    std::fstream myfile("D:\\data.txt", std::ios_base::in);

    float a;
    while (myfile >> a)
    {
        printf("%f ", a);
    }

    getchar();

    return 0;
}

Result:

45.779999 67.900002 87.000000 34.889999 346.000000 0.980000

If you know exactly, how many elements there are in a file, you can chain >> operator:

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    std::fstream myfile("D:\\data.txt", std::ios_base::in);

    float a, b, c, d, e, f;

    myfile >> a >> b >> c >> d >> e >> f;

    printf("%f\t%f\t%f\t%f\t%f\t%f\n", a, b, c, d, e, f);

    getchar();

    return 0;
}

Edit: In response to your comments in main question.

You have two options.

  • You can run previous code in a loop (or two loops) and throw away a defined number of values - for example, if you need the value at point (97, 60), you have to skip 5996 (= 60 * 100 + 96) values and use the last one. This will work if you're interested only in specified value.
  • You can load the data into an array - as Jerry Coffin sugested. He already gave you quite nice class, which will solve the problem. Alternatively, you can use simple array to store the data.

Edit: How to skip values in file

To choose the 1234th value, use the following code:

int skipped = 1233;
for (int i = 0; i < skipped; i++)
{
    float tmp;
    myfile >> tmp;
}
myfile >> value;
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot.. but i want to store these numbers in different variables. Should i first read all the numbers with a loop and store them into an array and then assign differnt elements of this array to variables ?? –  Usman Naseer Jan 25 '13 at 7:23
    
Have you read my whole answer? –  Spook Jan 25 '13 at 7:25
    
Remember to mark one of answers as accepted if it fits your needs. Otherwise don't hesitate to add comments if something needs to be cleared up. –  Spook Jan 25 '13 at 7:52
    
#include <iostream> #include <fstream> using namespace std; int main () {int data[6],a,b,c,d,e,f; ifstream myfile; myfile.open ("a.txt"); for (int i=0;i<<6;i++) { myfile>>data[i]; } myfile.close(); a=data[0]; b=data[1]; c=data[2]; d=data[3]; e=data[4]; f=data[5]; cout<<a<<"\t"<<b<<"\t"<<c<<"\t"<<d<<"\t"<<e<<"\t"<<f<<"\n"; system ("pause"); return 0;} –  Usman Naseer Jan 25 '13 at 8:03
    
Why didn't you use my second solution? Also, if you want to enter some code, edit your post rather than input it in comment. You pasted some code, where's the problem with it? –  Spook Jan 25 '13 at 8:04

It can depend, especially on whether your file will have the same number of items on each row or not. If it will, then you probably want a 2D matrix class of some sort, usually something like this:

class array2D { 
    std::vector<double> data;
    size_t columns;
public:
    array2D(size_t x, size_t y) : columns(x), data(x*y) {}

    double &operator(size_t x, size_t y) {
       return data[y*columns+x];
    }
};

Note that as it's written, this assumes you know the size you'll need up-front. That can be avoided, but the code gets a little larger and more complex.

In any case, to read the numbers and maintain the original structure, you'd typically read a line at a time into a string, then use a stringstream to read numbers from the line. This lets you store the data from each line into a separate row in your array.

If you don't know the size ahead of time or (especially) if different rows might not all contain the same number of numbers:

11 12 13
23 34 56 78

You might want to use a std::vector<std::vector<double> > instead. This does impose some overhead, but if different rows may have different sizes, it's an easy way to do the job.

std::vector<std::vector<double> > numbers;

std::string temp;

while (std::getline(infile, temp)) {
    std::istringstream buffer(temp);
    std::vector<double> line((std::istream_iterator<double>(buffer)),
                             std::istream_iterator<double>());

    numbers.push_back(line);
}

...or, with a modern (C++11) compiler, you can use brackets for line's initialization:

    std::vector<double> line{std::istream_iterator<double>(buffer),
                             std::istream_iterator<double>()};
share|improve this answer
    
bundle of thanks..but it will take some time for me to understand your reply :) –  Usman Naseer Jan 25 '13 at 7:28
1  
@UsmanNaseer: Perhaps the sample code I just added will be helpful. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 25 '13 at 7:29
    
Very nice, +1. That's what I call an idiomatic C++ solution. –  juanchopanza Jan 25 '13 at 7:35
    
All nice, but it doesn't have much to do with OP's problem - from what he wrote in comments, he wants to read each number into different variable... if I understood his last version correctly. –  Spook Jan 25 '13 at 8:39
    
I have got this error for the code: no matching function for call to ‘std::vector<std::vector<double> >::push_back(std::vector<double> (&)(std::istream_iterator<double>, std::istream_iterator<double> (*)()))’ –  user1436187 Jul 6 at 7:55

The input operator for number skips leading whitespace, so you can just read the number in a loop:

while (myfile >> a)
{
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. but the input operator reads the number row wise. how can i read the number in next column ?? –  Usman Naseer Jan 25 '13 at 7:04
    
you can read the number inside the loop. –  Christian Mark Jan 25 '13 at 7:10
    
@UsmanNaseer: with the loop suggested in this answer, the first time the loop is entered a will be 45.78, the next time 67.90, then 87, then 34.89, 346, and the final time 0.98. Is that not what you need? –  Tony D Jan 25 '13 at 7:25
    
@UsmanNaseer Remember that the file is a stream, and the data as seen by the program is in rows or columns, but a single stream like this: "45.78 67.90 87\n34.89 346 0.98". So the input operation will always read the next number in the stream, in "column" order so to speak. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 25 '13 at 7:55

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