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I have following script

 awk '{printf "%s", $1"-"$2", "}' $a >>positions;

where $a stores the name of the file. I am actually writing column values into the one row. However, I would like to print comma only if I am not on the last line.

Thanks for any help.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would do it by finding the number of lines before running the script, e.g. with coreutils and bash:

awk -v nlines=$(wc -l < $a) '{printf "%s", $1"-"$2} NR != nlines { printf ", " }' $a >>positions
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Thank you, that's it! –  Perlnika Jan 25 '13 at 8:30

Single pass approach:

cat "$a" | # look, I can use this in a pipeline! 
  awk 'NR > 1 { printf(", ") } { printf("%s-%s", $1, $2) }'

Note that I've also simplified the string formatting.

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Here's a better way, without resorting to coreutils:

awk 'FNR==NR { c++; next } { ORS = (FNR==c ? "\n" : ", "); print $1, $2 }' OFS="-" file file
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Why is this better than Thor's? When would you have awk but not wc? –  Michael J. Barber Jan 27 '13 at 13:12
    
@MichaelJ.Barber: A broken installation is the short answer. Regardless, it is much more awkish to simply write some code that emulates wc -l < file on the first pass then manipulate ORS as required on the second pass. Easy. Also, your answer is incomplete. You'll need yet another print statement in the END block to correct for a missing newline character at EOF. That's three print statements most of which don't do anything, really. On big files, your approach will be slow. Sarathi's answer will also be slow for very large files, because each line is added to memory and that's not ideal. –  Steve Jan 27 '13 at 17:37
    
Also, Thor has used two print statements when only one is really necessary. He's added a quick fix, when what was required was a re-write. HTH. –  Steve Jan 27 '13 at 17:39
awk '{a[NR]=$1"-"$2;next}END{for(i=1;i<NR;i++){print a[i]", " }}' $a > positions
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