Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a templated C++ class which has a templated member function as well. The template parameters of this member function are dependent on the class's template parameters in a specific way (please see the code below). I am instantiating (not specializing) this class for two different values of its template parameter. Everything compiles till this point. However, if I invoke the templated member function, the call for only the first instantiated object compiles and not the second one. It appears as if the compiler is not instantiating the templated member function for the second instantiation of the template class. I am compiling the code below using "g++ filename.cpp" and am getting the following error:

filename.cpp:63: error: no matching function for call to 'Manager<(Base)1u>::init(Combination<(Base)1u, (Dependent2)0u>*)’

This is the line calling b.init(&combination_2)

g++ --version => g++ (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.4.7-1ubuntu2) 4.4.7

uname -a => Linux 3.2.0-25-generic-pae #40-Ubuntu SMP i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux

enum Base {
  AA,
  BB,
  CC
};

enum Dependent1 {
  PP,
  QQ,
  RR
};

enum Dependent2 {
  XX,
  YY,
  ZZ
};

template<Base B>
struct DependentProperty {
};

template<>
struct DependentProperty<AA> {
  typedef Dependent1 Dependent;
};

template<>
struct DependentProperty<BB> {
  typedef Dependent2 Dependent;
};

template <Base B, typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent D>
class Combination {
 public:
  void reset() {}
  int o;
};

template <Base B>
class Manager {
 public:
  template <typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent D,
            template<Base,
                    typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent> class T>
  void init(T<B, D>* t);
};

template <Base B>
template <typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent D,
          template<Base,
                  typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent> class T>
void Manager<B>::init(T<B, D>* t) {
  t->reset();
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  Manager<AA> a;
  Manager<BB> b;
  Combination<AA, PP> combination_1;
  Combination<BB, XX> combination_2;
  a.init(&combination_1);
  b.init(&combination_2);
  return 0;
}

It is not feasible to modify the classes corresponding to Base, Dependent or Combination from my example code in our actual project. What I am really wondering is whether my syntax for defining Manager::init() is wrong, or whether there is some known property/feature/constraint of C++ or g++ that wouldn't allow this code?

share|improve this question
3  
it would have been wise to use typedef before the definition of the template function init(). typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent is reapeated twice, and it really doesn't help understanding. –  Stephane Rolland Jan 25 '13 at 9:36
    
I am not 100% sure, but this might be a compiler's bug –  BЈовић Jan 25 '13 at 10:51

3 Answers 3

The code below compiles for me, I have simplified your code a little, though it still does the same thing.

template <Base B>
class Manager {
 public:
typedef typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent D;  // if ever you need it
    template <typename TCombinaison>
    void init(TCombinaison* t)
    {
        t->reset();
    }

};

int main(int argc, char** argv) 
{
    typedef Combination<AA, PP> CombinaisonA;
    typedef Combination<BB, XX> CombinaisonB;

    typedef DependentProperty<AA> DependencyPropertyA;
    typedef DependentProperty<BB> DependencyPropertyB;

  CombinaisonA combination_1;
  CombinaisonB combination_2;

  Manager<AA> a;
  Manager<BB> b;

  a.init(&combination_1);
  b.init<&combination_2);

  return 0;
}

EDIT: A 2nd solution so as to forbid the mixed use of combination in managers, as the OP has noticed in the comments below. Now I'm using std::is_same to check the "concept" contract.

template <Base B, typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent D>
class Combination {
 public:
    typedef typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent DependencyType;
  void reset() {}
  int o;
};

template <Base B>
class Manager {
 public:
    typedef typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent DependencyType; 
    template <typename TCombinaison>
    void init(TCombinaison* t)
    {
        static_assert(std::is_same<TCombinaison::DependencyType, Manager::DependencyType>);
        t->reset();
    }

};
share|improve this answer
    
It is different from my intended code because it allows b.init(&combination_1) to also compile. I want init() to only accept those Combination objects which share the same Base template parameter with the Manager object whose init() is being called. –  user2010172 Jan 25 '13 at 10:55
    
that's right... –  Stephane Rolland Jan 25 '13 at 10:57
1  
@user2010172 I have modified the code accordingly, using std::is_same to check if the DependencyProperties are compatible. –  Stephane Rolland Jan 25 '13 at 11:10
    
Using std::is_same enforces compatibility but then there is one more difference from my intended code. In my intended code, init() could use the Dependent template parameter further (maybe to call other functions templated on that parameter), which it cannot now. Another minor point: now we require every TCombinaison candidate to additionally define a public DependencyType for the purpose of this std::is_same check. –  user2010172 Jan 25 '13 at 12:31
    
@user2010172 you are a little too fast in conclusion saying you can no longer... indeed the knowledge of type B and type D is accessible inside init(). Obviously your compiler, and also mine (VS2010 here) cannot deduce the types of the template template parameter. Maybe you should try some more explicit declarations. –  Stephane Rolland Jan 25 '13 at 12:51

If you combine inheritance and go away from constant template parameters, extend the Combination to provide info on its template arguments, you can get the code to compile taking into account that you don't want this to compile:

b.init(&combination_1);

You are trying very hard to specify and fix the type of the Combination for the init member template within your Manager indirectly, even though the init template will deduce it since it is the only parameter of the function, and the type si defined within main anyway.

Would you consider templating the init directly with the Combination?

This way, everything apart from the init() declaration remains the same, and your code compiles as you wanted to initially:

class Base
{
};

class AA
:
    public Base
{
};

class BB
: 
    public Base
{
};

class Dependent1
{
};

class PP
:
    public Dependent1
{};

class Dependent2
{};

class XX
:
    public Dependent2
{};

template<class Base>
struct DependentProperty {
};

template<>
struct DependentProperty<AA> {
  typedef Dependent1 Dependent;
};

template<>
struct DependentProperty<BB> {
  typedef Dependent2 Dependent;
};

template <class Base> 
class Combination {
 public:

     typedef Base CombinationBase;
     typedef typename DependentProperty<Base>::Dependent CombinationDependent;

     void reset() 
     {

     }

     int o;
};


template <class Base>
class Manager
{
    public:

        // Any type C
        template<class C>
        void init (C* t)
        {
            // Any type C conforming to the implicit interface holding reset()
            t->reset(); 
            // Forcing specific combination
            Base b = typename C::CombinationBase(); 
            // Forcing it again
            typename DependentProperty<Base>::Dependent d = typename C::CombinationDependent();
        }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

  Combination<AA> combination_1;
  Manager<AA> a;
  a.init(&combination_1);

  Manager<BB> b;
  Combination<BB> combination_2;
  b.init(&combination_2);

  b.init(&combination_1);

  return 0;
}

In this case, you can extend the Combination template to provide access to its template parameters to the client code. Of course the template C in this case becomes a refinement of the Combination concept as soon as you rely on its implementation within the init member function (accessing the stored template argument values, etc).

share|improve this answer
    
This suggestion is indeed correct, but I've edited my original question above to reflect why I won't be able to take this route. –  user2010172 Jan 27 '13 at 11:59
    
@user2010172 ok.. I'll take another look.. but it is weird that the first combination works, and not the second... –  tmaric Jan 27 '13 at 14:15

The only thing I see is

template <typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent D,
          template<Base, <-- wrong
                typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent <-- wrong
          > class T>
void init(T<B, D>* t);

Your class Combination waits values as a template parameter, but you want to give him types

I spent some time to fix it - like that

template <typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent D,
          template<Base BB,
                typename DependentProperty<BB>::Dependent DD
          > class T>
void init(T<B, D>* t);

and many other variants, but had no success.

Excuse me for arrange it as an answer, but I couldn't type so many code in a comment

share|improve this answer
    
template<Base> is the same as template<Base BB>. Perhaps you were thinking of template<typename Base> ? –  Ben Voigt Jan 25 '13 at 22:31
    
@BenVoigt you're right. But what about typename DependentProperty<B>::Dependent ? What will template think about that typename ? –  borisbn Jan 28 '13 at 6:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.