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I want to find the means of all values in groups of columns. A given group of columns might contain missing observations. I want to replace the missing observations within a group of columns by the mean for that group of columns. In my case the number of columns per group is a constant, years.

Below is code that does this. However, I am hoping someone might provide code that is much more efficient. The lapply finds the mean for a given group of columns. However, I have not yet come up with a similar approach for replacing the missing observations. Thank you for any advice.

Here is an example data set:

my.first.year <- 1980
my.last.year  <- 1982
years <- (my.last.year - my.first.year) + 1

x = read.table(text = "
 city county   state      a80    a81    a82    b80     b81   b82
  1      B       AA        2      20    200     4       8     12
  2      B       AA        4      NA    400     5       9     NA
  1      C       AA        6      60     NA    NA      10     14
  2      C       AA       NA      80    800     7      11     15    
", sep = "", header = TRUE, stringsAsFactors = FALSE)

(2 + 4 + 6 + 20 + 60 + 80 + 200 + 400 + 800) / 9
(4 + 5 + 7 + 8 + 9 + 10 + 11 + 12 + 14 + 15) / 10

my.means <- lapply( seq(4, ncol(x), years) , function(i) { mean(unlist(x[,i : (i+years-1) ]) , na.rm=TRUE) } )
my.means

x2 <- x

x2[,(3+years*0+1):(3+years*1)][is.na(x2[,(3+years*0+1):(3+years*1)])] = my.means[[1]]
x2[,(3+years*1+1):(3+years*2)][is.na(x2[,(3+years*1+1):(3+years*2)])] = my.means[[2]]

Here is the result:

#   city county state      a80      a81      a82 b80 b81  b82
# 1    1      B    AA   2.0000  20.0000 200.0000 4.0   8 12.0
# 2    2      B    AA   4.0000 174.6667 400.0000 5.0   9  9.5
# 3    1      C    AA   6.0000  60.0000 174.6667 9.5  10 14.0
# 4    2      C    AA 174.6667  80.0000 800.0000 7.0  11 15.0
share|improve this question
    
The group of columns is not given by their names, e.g a* and b*? It is not clear how you group the data , in the code you take 3 (years) columns then , the 3 after... –  agstudy Jan 25 '13 at 10:16
    
Ignoring the first 3 columns there are three columns in each group. The plyr answers are nice, but I would prefer a solution in base. –  Mark Miller Jan 25 '13 at 10:23
    
@MarkMiller I've added one, by converting data from wide to long format, which I think makes more sense. It is similar in spirit to agstudy's answer. –  Gavin Simpson Jan 25 '13 at 11:09
    
@MarkMiller. Another solutions using base R. Shorter, more concise code :-) –  Ramnath Jan 25 '13 at 15:42
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is another solution using reshape from base R, an often forgotten function with amazing power.

x2 = reshape(x, direction = 'long', varying = 4:9, sep = "")
x2[,c('a', 'b')] = apply(x2[,c('a', 'b')], 2, function(y){
  y[is.na(y)] = mean(y, na.rm = T)
  return(y)
})
x3 = reshape(x2, direction = 'wide', idvar = names(x2)[1:3], timevar = 'time', 
 sep = "")

Here is how it works. First, we reshape the data to long format, where a and b become columns and the years become rows. Second, we replace NAs in columns a and b with their respective means. Finally, we reshape the data back to the wide format. reshape is a confusing function, but working through the examples on the help page will get you up to speed.

EDIT

To reorder columns, you can do

x3[,names(x)]

To replace the rownames, you can do

rownames(x3) = 1:NROW(x3)
share|improve this answer
    
That is nice! I would refer to use base R. However, the columns become reordered and multiple extraneous id columns are created and added throughout the final data set. I suppose a clever re-ordering of columns by name could adjust for that. –  Mark Miller Jan 25 '13 at 15:45
    
See my edit for how to reorder columns and to replace rownames. –  Ramnath Jan 25 '13 at 15:57
    
Very nice. Perfect. –  Mark Miller Jan 25 '13 at 16:02
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One answer, but maybe not the simplest one, which uses the plyr and reshape2 packages :

library(reshape2)
library(plyr)

First, transform your data frame from a "wide" to a "long" format (one observation per line) and create a groups column :

mx <- melt(x, id.vars=c("city","country","state"))
mx$groups[mx$variable %in% c("a80","a81","a82")] <- 1
mx$groups[mx$variable %in% c("b80","b81","b82")] <- 2
head(mx)

The first lines of your data should now look like this :

  city county state variable value groups
1    1      B    AA      a80     2      1
2    2      B    AA      a80     4      1
3    1      C    AA      a80     6      1
4    2      C    AA      a80    NA      1
5    1      B    AA      a81    20      1
6    2      B    AA      a81    NA      1

Then you can use ddply to replace the missing values by the means :

mx <- ddply(mx, .(groups), function(df) {df$value[is.na(df$value)] <- mean(df$value, na.rm=TRUE); return(df)})

And finally use dcast to get your data back to "long" format :

x <- dcast(mx, city + county + state ~ variable)
x

Which gives :

  city county state      a80      a81      a82 b80 b81  b82
1    1      B    AA   2.0000  20.0000 200.0000 4.0   8 12.0
2    1      C    AA   6.0000  60.0000 174.6667 9.5  10 14.0
3    2      B    AA   4.0000 174.6667 400.0000 5.0   9  9.5
4    2      C    AA 174.6667  80.0000 800.0000 7.0  11 15.0
share|improve this answer
1  
(+1). maybe for mx$groups you could use gsub("[0-9]+", "", mx$variable)?? –  Arun Jan 25 '13 at 10:17
    
@Arun For me it is not clear how the Op would group the data. Even what you propose is more logic here, it groups data by years, 3 by 3.. –  agstudy Jan 25 '13 at 10:23
    
@Arun, yes, if there are many groups it is certainly better to do it your way. –  juba Jan 25 '13 at 10:25
1  
@agstudy, he says he always has 3 columns. But even if it were not so, it would be reasonable to assume the ones with a form a group and b form another. So, after melting, variable has a80, a81.... One could directly extract the equivalent of group by just removing the numbers. At least that's what I thought. –  Arun Jan 25 '13 at 10:25
1  
@Arun +1 The necessary information is essentially contained within the varying column names. I combined the melt() idea from here and processed variable, and then worked on that. –  Gavin Simpson Jan 25 '13 at 11:12
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You are making things more difficult for yourself having the data stored in a wide format as compared to a long format. My Take on this would be to convert to a long format using melt() from the reshape2 package. Using your data

my.first.year <- 1980
my.last.year  <- 1982

x <- read.table(text = "
 city county   state      a80    a81    a82    b80     b81   b82
  1      B       AA        2      20    200     4       8     12
  2      B       AA        4      NA    400     5       9     NA
  1      C       AA        6      60     NA    NA      10     14
  2      C       AA       NA      80    800     7      11     15    
", sep = "", header = TRUE, stringsAsFactors = FALSE)

First we melt() x and do some manipulations of variable to get the group and the year

require(reshape2)

xx <- melt(x, id.vars = c("city","county","state"))
## Add year and group variables by process the `variable` column
xx <- transform(xx, year = as.numeric(sub("^[a-zA-Z]", "", variable)),
                group = regmatches(variable, regexpr("^[a-zA-Z]", variable)), 
                stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
## format start and end years as per way stored in column names
start <- as.numeric(substring(my.first.year, first = 3))
end <- as.numeric(substring(my.last.year, first = 3))

start and end are formatted versions of your start and end years without the century part. At this point xx looks like

> head(xx)
  city county state variable value year group
1    1      B    AA      a80     2   80     a
2    2      B    AA      a80     4   80     a
3    1      C    AA      a80     6   80     a
4    2      C    AA      a80    NA   80     a
5    1      B    AA      a81    20   81     a
6    2      B    AA      a81    NA   81     a

Next I use one of the base R split-apply-combine idioms, and split() xx by group

xxs <- split(xx, f = xx$group)

Then lapply() can apply a function to subset by year for the years indicated to lie in or between start:end. I compute the mean of the value variable for the subset values, removing NAs. The we return the mean.

foo <- function(x, start, end) {
  take <- with(x, year >= start & year <= end)
  xbar <- mean(x[take, "value"], na.rm = TRUE)
  xbar
}

lapply(xxs, foo, start = start, end = end)

This gives:

> lapply(xxs, foo, start = start, end = end)
$a
[1] 174.6667

$b
[1] 9.5

As for a function to replace the NAs, a minor modification of foo() achieves this:

foor <- function(x, start, end) {
  take <- with(x, year >= start & year <= end)
  xbar <- mean(x[take, "value"], na.rm = TRUE)
  nas <- is.na(x[take, "value"]) ## which are NA?
  x[take, "value"][nas] <- xbar  ## replace NA with xbar
  x                              ## return
}

To get back a data frame I wrap this in do.call() which arranges to call rbind() on the output from lapply():

xx2 <- do.call(rbind, lapply(xxs, foor, start = start, end = end))

which gives:

> head(xx2)
    city county state variable    value year group
a.1    1      B    AA      a80   2.0000   80     a
a.2    2      B    AA      a80   4.0000   80     a
a.3    1      C    AA      a80   6.0000   80     a
a.4    2      C    AA      a80 174.6667   80     a
a.5    1      B    AA      a81  20.0000   81     a
a.6    2      B    AA      a81 174.6667   81     a

If you need to go back to the original format of data, then dcast() (also from reshape2) is your friend:

x2 <- dcast(xx2[, 1:5], city + county + state ~ variable)

> head(x)
  city county state a80 a81 a82 b80 b81 b82
1    1      B    AA   2  20 200   4   8  12
2    2      B    AA   4  NA 400   5   9  NA
3    1      C    AA   6  60  NA  NA  10  14
4    2      C    AA  NA  80 800   7  11  15
> head(x2)
  city county state      a80      a81      a82 b80 b81  b82
1    1      B    AA   2.0000  20.0000 200.0000 4.0   8 12.0
2    1      C    AA   6.0000  60.0000 174.6667 9.5  10 14.0
3    2      B    AA   4.0000 174.6667 400.0000 5.0   9  9.5
4    2      C    AA 174.6667  80.0000 800.0000 7.0  11 15.0
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I use your code , and I add one line na.fill ( even I don't like your grouping by 3 columns).

EDIT

The na.fill is the zoo package. It was so handy , that I thought it is in the base package. Next time I restart my session before posting here.

ll <- lapply( seq(4, ncol(x), years) , 
        function(i) { 
          m <- mean(unlist(x[,i : (i+years-1) ]) , na.rm=TRUE) 
          na.fill(x[,i : (i+years-1) ],m)      ## here the line I add 
          } 
        )
do.call(cbind,ll)   



    a80      a81      a82 b80 b81  b82
[1,]   2.0000  20.0000 200.0000 4.0   8 12.0
[2,]   4.0000 174.6667 400.0000 5.0   9  9.5
[3,]   6.0000  60.0000 174.6667 9.5  10 14.0
[4,] 174.6667  80.0000 800.0000 7.0  11 15.0

I would use something like this to select columns :

lapply(c('a','b'),function(i){
       cols.group <- regmatches(colnames(x),
                                regexpr(paste(i,"[0-9]+",sep=''),colnames(x)))
       m <- mean(unlist(x[,cols.group]) , na.rm=TRUE) 
       na.fill(x[,cols.group ],m) 
})


do.call(cbind,ll)   
cbind(x[,!grepl("(a|b)[0-9]+",colnames(x))],do.call(cbind,ll))

  city county state      a80      a81      a82 b80 b81  b82
1    1      B    AA   2.0000  20.0000 200.0000 4.0   8 12.0
2    2      B    AA   4.0000 174.6667 400.0000 5.0   9  9.5
3    1      C    AA   6.0000  60.0000 174.6667 9.5  10 14.0
4    2      C    AA 174.6667  80.0000 800.0000 7.0  11 15.0
share|improve this answer
    
It would be nice to return the city, county and state variables too. Couldn't you assign the output from na.fill() to those same columns of x? Something like x[cols.group] <- na.fill(x[,cols.group ],m)? +1 for na.fill() (I did it that step by hand as I was unaware of that function!). –  Gavin Simpson Jan 25 '13 at 11:14
    
@GavinSimpson I update my answer. I can't use your idea since the lapply will be applied in the original x. –  agstudy Jan 25 '13 at 12:20
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I could have given the check mark to any of the answers, but I prefer Ramnath's answer because it is entirely in base R and seems very straight-forward. However, when I tried to use his answer I realized that I needed separate means for each of numerous states. So, I modified his answer as follows:

my.first.year <- 1980
my.last.year  <- 1982
years <- (my.last.year - my.first.year) + 1

x = read.table(text = "
 city county   state      a80    a81    a82    b80     b81   b82
  1      B       AA        2      20    200     4       8     12
  2      B       AA        4      NA    400     5       9     NA
  1      C       AA        6      60     NA    NA      10     14
  2      C       AA       NA      80    800     7      11     15

  1      A       BB        1       2      1     2       2      2
  2      A       BB        2      NA      1     2       2     NA
  1      B       BB        1       1     NA    NA       2      2
  2      B       BB       NA       2      1     2       2     10
", sep = "", header = TRUE, stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
x

x2 = reshape(x, direction = 'long', varying = 4:9, sep = "")

x2 <- x2[order(x2$state, x2$time),]

x2[,c('a', 'b')] = apply(x2[,c('a', 'b')], 2, function(z) {
      sapply(split(z, x2$state), 
      function(y) {  y[is.na(y)] = mean(y, na.rm = T)  
      return(y)   }) 
      })
x2

x3 <- reshape(x2, direction = 'wide', idvar = names(x2)[1:3], timevar = 'time', 
 sep = "")

x3[,names(x)]

This code seems to work. Although, for some reason I needed to order x2 by state. I do not entirely understand the return statement. If I find that the code does not work with future data sets I will edit this post to address the issue.

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