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In bash, given input

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
...

And N for example 5, I want the output

1  6  11
2  7  12
3  8  ...
4  9
5  10 

How do I do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

replace 5 in following script with your number.

seq 20|xargs -n5| awk '{for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) a[i,NR]=$i; }END{
    for(i=1;i<=NF;i++) {for(j=1;j<=NR;j++)printf a[i,j]" "; print "" }}' 

output:

1 6 11 16 
2 7 12 17 
3 8 13 18 
4 9 14 19 
5 10 15 20

note seq 20 above there is just for generating the number sequence for testing. You don't need it in your real work.

EDIT

as pointed out by sudo_O, I add an pure awk solution:

 awk -vn=5 '{a[NR]=$0}END{ x=1; while (x<=n){ for(i=x;i<=length(a);i+=n) printf a[i]" "; print ""; x++; } }' file

test

kent$  seq 20| awk -vn=5 '{a[NR]=$0}END{ x=1; while (x<=n){ for(i=x;i<=length(a);i+=n) printf a[i]" "; print ""; x++; } }'     
1 6 11 16 
2 7 12 17 
3 8 13 18 
4 9 14 19 
5 10 15 20 

kent$  seq 12| awk -vn=5 '{a[NR]=$0}END{ x=1; while (x<=n){ for(i=x;i<=length(a);i+=n) printf a[i]" "; print ""; x++; } }'     
1 6 11 
2 7 12 
3 8 
4 9 
5 10 
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Works, thanks, accepted. –  vektor Jan 25 '13 at 10:13
    
This fails if the input file length isn't a multiple of 5. –  iiSeymour Jan 25 '13 at 10:23
    
@sudo_O thx for pointing it out, I didn't test on that case, now a pure awk one-liner added. –  Kent Jan 25 '13 at 10:41
    
Nice plus one.. –  iiSeymour Jan 25 '13 at 10:43
1  
You can use {1..12} instead of seq 12. –  uzsolt Jan 25 '13 at 20:59

Using a little known gem pr:

$ seq 20 | pr -ts' ' --column 4
1 6 11 16
2 7 12 17
3 8 13 18
4 9 14 19
5 10 15 20
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Can you please explain how this command works –  user2134226 Jan 26 '13 at 8:52
    
It's only a gem if it can complete the job. You should test this with seq 21 for example. As you'll see, you'll need some post processing in order to achieve the desired output. Otherwise the command above will fail without some modification. –  Steve Jan 26 '13 at 9:04
    
@user19340357: I'm not convinced it achieves the desired results. Regardless, when researching how a command works, you should first take a look at the man page for that particular command. In this case, type: man pr to see the man page for pr. Given that there's only three options passed to pr in this instance, is there a particular flag that isn't well documented that you need more explanation? –  Steve Jan 26 '13 at 9:08

Here's how I'd do it with awk:

awk -v n=5 '{ c++ } c>n { c=1 } { a[c] = (a[c] ? a[c] FS : "") $0 } END { for (i=1;i<=n;i++) print a[i] }'

Some simple testing:

seq 21 | awk -v n=5 '{ c++ } c>n { c=1 } { a[c] = (a[c] ? a[c] FS : "") $0 } END { for (i=1;i<=n;i++) print a[i] | "column -t" }'

Results:

1  6   11  16  21
2  7   12  17
3  8   13  18
4  9   14  19
5  10  15  20

And another:

seq 40 | awk -v n=6 '{ c++ } c>n { c=1 } { a[c] = (a[c] ? a[c] FS : "") $0 } END { for (i=1;i<=n;i++) print a[i] | "column -t" }'

Results:

1  7   13  19  25  31  37
2  8   14  20  26  32  38
3  9   15  21  27  33  39
4  10  16  22  28  34  40
5  11  17  23  29  35
6  12  18  24  30  36
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