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I have a simple function that I simplified to return just a dummy list (to ensure its not some logic error)

vector<AttrValue>* QueryEvaluator::getCandidateList(...) {
    ...
    values.clear();
    values.push_back(2);
    values.push_back(3);
    cout << "values is of size " << values.size() << endl;
    return &values;
}

then in a cppunit test:

vector<AttrValue>* candidateList0 = evaluator->getCandidateList(cl, 0);
cout << candidateList0->size() << endl;

But problem is size(), in the test, is always 0 even though the cout message prints the correct size 2. What might be wrong?

I tried a simple program and it appears to be fine ...

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

vector<int>* test() {
    vector<int> vec { 2, 3, 6, 1, 2, 3 };
    return &vec;
}

int main() {
    cout << test()->size() << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
You should probably return by reference rather pointer to indicate that you are not transferring ownership. – Loki Astari Jan 25 '13 at 11:11
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are returning a the address of temporary from getCandidateList function, the object is release when function returns. access to it is undefined behavior. You could just return the vector out, RVO should come to apply and elide the copy:

Try:

std::vector<AttrValue> QueryEvaluator::getCandidateList(...) 
{
  //blah
  return values; 
}

I tried a simple program and it appears to be fine ...

the temporary vector is released when getCandidateList function returns. The program has undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer

Your vector appears to be declared on the stack so will be destroyed when it goes out of scope (when the function exits). If you want to return a pointer to a vector, allocate it on the heap instead

vector<AttrValue>* QueryEvaluator::getCandidateList(...) {
    vector<AttrValue>* values = new vector<AttrValue>();
    ...
    values->clear();
    values->push_back(2);
    values->push_back(3);
    cout << "values is of size " << values->size() << endl;
    return values;
}

It might be easier to instead declare it in the caller and pass a reference to getCandidateList

void QueryEvaluator::getCandidateList(vector<AttrValue>& values)

...or return it by value

vector<AttrValue> QueryEvaluator::getCandidateList(...) {
share|improve this answer
1  
No don't use dynamic memory (no heap). Especially when returning a pointer (no ownership semantics are defined). There is obviously an object here. Why is the vector not part of the object. Then returning a reference (or pointer) would work correctly. – Loki Astari Jan 25 '13 at 11:13

So many interesting things to consider:

vector<AttrValue>* QueryEvaluator::getCandidateList(...) {
    ...
    values.clear();
    values.push_back(2);
    values.push_back(3);
    cout << "values is of size " << values.size() << endl;
    return &values;
}

So it looks like you left out the most interesting piece in the code ... above. Moral of the story try and provide compilable working code that shows the error. Reducing your problem to a small example usually results in you finding the problem yourself. At the very least you should provide exact definitions of all objects that are used (the type is the most important thing in C++)

Does it declare the vector as a local object?

 std::vector<int>  values;

In this case the vectors lifespan is bound to the function and it is destroyed at the end of the function. This means using it after the function has returned is undefined behavior (anything can happen).

But it also looks like you are using objects as part of you unit test framework. So a potential solution is to make the vector part of the object. Then the vector will live as long as the object (not just the function call) and thus returning a pointer to it will work as expected.

 class  QueryEvaluator
 {
     std::vector<int>   values;
     public:
         vector<AttrValue>* QueryEvaluator::getCandidateList(...);
 };

An alternative would be to return the vector by value rather than a pointer. This means the object will be correctly copied out of the function and your calling code can manipulate and test the vector all they need.

vector<AttrValue> QueryEvaluator::getCandidateList(...)
{
    ...
    return &values;
}

Side Note:

Also you need to try not to use pointers in your code. Pointers doe not convey any ownership.This means we do not know who is responsible for deleting the object. In this case a reference would probably have been better (you never return NULL) as this gives the caller access to the object will retaining ownership (assuming you decided not to return by value).

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I agree pointers can be very confusing ... but I was under the impression if I return normally, it will create a copy which is less efficient? – Jiew Meng Jan 25 '13 at 11:32
1  
@JiewMeng: Yes but a copy will always work. Also the compiler can optimize away the copy in most situations (this is one one of them (look up NVRO)) so in reality it will not be less efficient. – Loki Astari Jan 25 '13 at 11:38

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