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Consider we are having a class as show below

public class Hotel
{
    public List<Room> lstRooms;
    public List<Room> objLstRoom = new List<Room>();
}

If I create an object for this Hotel class,

  • What would be the difference between these two variables in that object?
  • Since list would be empty initially, what would have been stored in it?
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9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted

lstRooms Will be null, objLstRoom will be an empty List<Room>, no elements.

This means for example, that lstRooms.Add(new Room()) will throw a null reference exception, objLstRoom.Add(new Room) will just work.

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The first one is null. The second one isn't.

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If you don't assign anything to a member it would be assigned default value, so it would be equal to writing

public class Hotel
{
    public List<Room> lstRooms = default(List<Room>);
    public List<Room> objLstRoom = new List<Room>();
}

for reference types, default is null, so first variable will become null.

What about other list, it would be initialized, but would remain empty, as you said.

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lstRooms is null but objLstRoom is empty list. If you access lstRooms you will get null reference exception.

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  • List<Room> lstRooms would be null and
  • List<Room> objLstRoom = new List<Room>() would be an empty list

So the first would be a hotel with 0 rooms and the second would be a hotel with none defined rooms.

Calling an instance method on a null List causes a crash:

int count = lstRooms.Count; // crash because lstRooms is null

but

int count = objLstRoom.Count; // => 0

So what is better? I would always prefer an empty list.

Because this sucks:

if(hotelInstance.objLstRoom != null)
{
  foreach(va room in hotelInstance.objLstRoom)
    /* .... */
}

This is better

foreach(va room in hotelInstance.objLstRoom)
    /* .... */
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Your code is equivalent to:

public class Hotel
{
    public List<Room> lstRooms;
    public List<Room> objLstRoom;

    public Hotel()
    {
        objLstRoom = null;  // Default initialization in .NET
        objLstRoom = new List<Room>()
    }
}
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Default initialization in .NET is not quite true - default initialization for a reference type maybe... –  David M Jan 25 '13 at 11:46
    
Nearly equivalent, anyway. They happen at subtly different times, with respect to the base class constructor. –  Jon Skeet Jan 25 '13 at 11:47

What would be the difference between these two variables in that object?

The lstRoom will be null, the objLstRoom will be an empty list.

Since list would be empty initially, what would have been stored in it?

Neither lstRoom or objLstRoom will have nothing stored.

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public class Hotel
{
    public List<Room> lstRooms; // null
    public List<Room> objLstRoom = new List<Room>(); // empty list
}

To answer your questions:

  1. What would be the difference between these two variables in that object?

    lstRooms would be null and objLstRoom would be an empty list.

  2. Since list would be empty initially, what would have been stored in it?

    It would have nothing stored in it.

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I've always tried to think of it as a box.

So public List<Room> lstRooms; is an empty box. It has enough space to fit a list of room objects in it, but as it sits does not actually contain a list. (yet)

public List<Room> objLstRoom = new List<Room>(); is a box with a room list in it already. The constructor gets called which is a pretty big distinction.

In the first example you are creating a reference to a list. Like a pointer, but the 2nd example you are actually creating a list.

If you try to call something like lstRooms.Add(new Room()); you're going to get an unassigned variable error because the object does not exist for the new room to be added to. Where as the objLstRoom.Add(new Room()); will work just fine.

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