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I am wondering about the big performance difference of a fft and a simple addition on a GPU using Matlab. I would expect that a fft is slower on the GPU than a simple addition. But why is it the other way around? Any suggestions?

a=rand(2.^20,1);
a=gpuArray(a);
b=gpuArray(0);
c=gpuArray(1);

tic % should take a long time
for k=1:1000
    fft(a);
end
toc % Elapsed time is 0.085893 seconds.

tic % should be fast, but isn't
for k=1:1000
    b=b+c;
end
toc %  Elapsed time is 1.430682 seconds.

It is also interesting to note that the computational time for the addition (second loop) decreases if I reduce the length of the vetor a.

EDIT

If I change the order of the two loops, i.e. if the addition is done first, the addition takes 0.2 seconds instead of 1.4 seconds. The FFT time is still the same.

share|improve this question
    
In your example, b and c are scalars. Is that on purpose? – Jonas Jan 25 '13 at 12:36
    
Which release of MATLAB? – Edric Jan 25 '13 at 12:52
    
I use Matlab r2012b. @Jonas, you are right, it is intended that b and ca are scalars. The main point is, why is the scalar addition that slow. I am trying to optimize my Matlab code, but its always this kind of addition which makes my code slow. – user2010822 Jan 26 '13 at 12:38

I'm guessing that Matlab isn't actually running the fft because the output is not used anywhere. Also, in your simple addition loop, each iteration depends on the previous one, so it has to run serially.

I don't know why the order of the loops matters. Maybe it has something to do with cleaning up the GPU memory after the first loop. You could try calling pause(1) between the loops to let your computer get back to an idle state before the second loop. That may make your timing more consistent.

share|improve this answer
    
It does not change any thing if I write g=fft(a) instead of just fft(a). The fft is till much faster. – user2010822 Jan 26 '13 at 12:39
    
But g is not used anywhere, so it still may be optimized away. What if you run s = 0; for k=1:1000, s = s + fft(a); end? – shoelzer Jan 28 '13 at 2:27
    
Okay, your are right. It was optimized away. Thank you. But I am still wondering about the addition. Even if the FFT was opitimzed away, why does the comutation time of the addition depends if it is carried out befor or after the FFT? – user2010822 Jan 28 '13 at 9:28
    
Not sure about the ordering of loops. I put a guess in my answer. – shoelzer Jan 28 '13 at 14:15

I don't have a 2012b MATLAB with GPU to hand to check this but I think that you are missing a wait() command. In 2012a, MATLAB introduced asynchronous GPU calculations. So, when you send something to the GPU it doesn't wait until its finished before moving on in code. Try this:

mygpu=gpuDevice(1);

a=rand(2.^20,1);
a=gpuArray(a);
b=gpuArray(0);
c=gpuArray(1);

tic % should take a long time
for k=1:1000
    fft(a);
end
wait(mygpu); %Wait until the GPU has finished calculating before moving on
toc 

tic % should be fast
for k=1:1000
    b=b+c;
end
wait(mygpu); %Wait until the GPU has finished calculating before moving on
toc

The computation time of the addition should no longer depend on when its carried out. Would you mind checking and getting back to me please?

share|improve this answer
    
I checked your code. The first loop takes about 1.2sec while the second (addition) takes only 0.2sec (on MATLAB2012b). – user2010822 Feb 26 '13 at 11:47

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