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I have the following data frame that I want to order by the fifth column ("Distance"). When I try `

df.order <- df[order(df[, 5]), ]

I always get the following error message.

Error in order(df[, 5]) : unimplemented type 'list' in 'orderVector1'`

I don't know why R consider my data frame as a list. Running is.data.frame(df) returns TRUE. I have to admit that is.list(df) also returns TRUE. Is is possible to force my data frame to be only a data frame and not a list? Thanks for your help.

structure(list(ID = list(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10), 
               Latitude = list(50.7368, 50.7368, 50.7368, 50.7369, 50.7369, 50.737, 50.737, 50.7371, 50.7371, 50.7371), 
               Longitude = list(6.0873, 6.0873, 6.0873, 6.0872, 6.0872, 6.0872, 6.0872, 6.0872, 6.0872, 6.0872), 
               Elevation = list(269.26, 268.99, 268.73, 268.69, 268.14, 267.87, 267.61, 267.31, 267.21, 267.02), 
               Distance = list(119.4396, 119.4396, 119.4396, 121.199, 121.199, 117.5658, 117.5658, 114.9003, 114.9003, 114.9003), 
               RxPower = list(-52.6695443922406, -52.269130891243, -52.9735258244422, -52.2116571930007, -51.7784534281727, -52.7703448813654, -51.6558862949081, -52.2892907635308, -51.8322993596551, -52.4971436682333)), 
          .Names = c("ID", "Latitude", "Longitude", "Elevation", "Distance", "RxPower"),
          row.names = c(NA, 10L), class = "data.frame")
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2  
What did you do to create such a data.frame? It's quite unusual. –  Roland Jan 25 '13 at 12:35
    
I think he created it using structure(..) and used list(.) instead of c(.) in creating columns. –  Arun Jan 25 '13 at 12:49
    
@Roland I created the data frame using another function that output the single columns as list using lapply to avoid for loops. Maybe I should have solved it with sapply instead. –  Yann Jan 25 '13 at 13:03
    
No, you should have used do.call(cbind,...) or something similar on the lapply output. –  Roland Jan 25 '13 at 13:07
    
@Roland WOW. Really nice idea. –  Yann Jan 25 '13 at 13:11
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your data frame contains lists, not vectors. You can convert this data frame to the "classical" format using as.data.frame and unlist:

df2 <- as.data.frame(lapply(df, unlist))

Now, the new data frame could be sorted in the intended way:

df2[order(df2[, 5]), ]
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Works like a charm. Thanks. –  Yann Jan 25 '13 at 12:52
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I've illustrated with a small example what's the problem:

df <- structure(list(ID = c(1, 2, 3, 4), 
          Latitude = c(50.7368, 50.7368, 50.7368, 50.7369), 
          Longitude = c(6.0873, 6.0873, 6.0873, 6.0872), 
          Elevation = c(269.26, 268.99, 268.73, 268.69), 
          Distance = c(119.4396, 119.4396, 119.4396, 121.199), 
          RxPower = c(-52.6695443922406, -52.269130891243, -52.9735258244422, 
                         -52.2116571930007)), 
          .Names = c("ID", "Latitude", "Longitude", "Elevation", "Distance", "RxPower"), 
          row.names = c(NA, 4L), class = "data.frame")

Notice that list only occurs once. And all the values are wrapped by c(.) and not list(.). This is why doing sapply(df, class) on your data resulted in all columns having class list.

Now,

> sapply(df, classs)
#       ID  Latitude Longitude Elevation  Distance   RxPower 
# "numeric" "numeric" "numeric" "numeric" "numeric" "numeric" 

Now order works:

> df[order(df[,4]), ]  
#   ID Latitude Longitude Elevation Distance   RxPower
# 4  4  50.7369    6.0872    268.69 121.1990 -52.21166
# 3  3  50.7368    6.0873    268.73 119.4396 -52.97353
# 2  2  50.7368    6.0873    268.99 119.4396 -52.26913
# 1  1  50.7368    6.0873    269.26 119.4396 -52.66954
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U're definitely right. I should convert all the columns of my data frame to vectors instead of list. Thanks. –  Yann Jan 25 '13 at 12:48
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This turns you data.frame of lists into a matrix:

mat <- sapply(df,unlist)

Now you can order it.

mat[order(mat[,5]),]

If all columns are of one type, e.g., numeric, a matrix often is preferable, because operations on matrices are faster than on data.frames. However, you can transform to a data.frame using as.data.frame(mat).

Btw, a data.frame is a special kind of list and thus is.list returns TRUE for every data.frame.

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Nice idea with the matrix. Thanks. –  Yann Jan 25 '13 at 12:53
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