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BACKGROUND / IDEA
I am currently working on a small framework just to improve my php-knowledge. This framework should be very simple (minimizing overhead) and flexible in terms of later expansion.

DIFFERENT MEANINGS
As a result of reading more advanced tutorials, notes of serious php-developers, different class structures (singletons, Singletons, dependency injection, JIT, ...), oop, mvc, routing, caching... and a lot more I find it very difficult to filter "the proper way" (if there is one) as it seems to me that everyone says something different.

Many people praise there opinon as "the best" and say that everything appart from that is evil. In my oppinion there is not a right or false. There are just several ways to achieve one's goal.

WHAT I DID SO FAR

  • index: ini settings, define constants, call bootstrap (not oop)
  • booting: autoloader class, namespaces (include files on demand)
  • static classes: htmlManager, fileHandler, databaseManager, ...
  • singletons: none
  • non-static classes: controller, models, views, routes, ...

I know that this is very basic and I did not that much so far but I want to create a solid platform first.

QUESTIONS
Before I want to go any further in my project I'd love to hear your opinion on the things listed below.

  • How do you organise/structure small or even bigger projects?
  • What are your experiences concerning simplicity, logic, performance, readability, expandability and reusability of code?
  • Is there really a "proper way" of coding or it this just interpretation?
  • Is there anything one should not use because it is already obsolete?

WHAT I DON'T WANT TO HEAR

  • Forget about a framework or php
  • Don't do this, don't do that without naming the reason why

Many thanks in prior for every response I get.

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closed as not constructive by Nanne, simone, tereško, KatieK, Ed Heal Jan 25 '13 at 17:53

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
dont do this: why? dont reinvent the wheel –  dynamic Jan 25 '13 at 12:42
4  
@link As an exercise, writing a small framework is a very good use of time. You might even end up with something useful afterwards. –  Will Vousden Jan 25 '13 at 12:44
1  
This is a REALLY wide question, and an neverending list of opinions I concider a bit OT here. Either what you state is true (there is no right/wrong, too many opinions, etc) and you have a non-constructive question, or it is false (your premise is false) and you should specify what discussion/opinions you have trouble with so we can pick the right one ;) –  Nanne Jan 25 '13 at 12:44
    
@Nanne I see. If someone can give me a constructive answer on each question in 2 to 5 sentence each then I will sure tick accepted. –  F. Müller Jan 25 '13 at 12:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I am currently working on a small framework just to improve my php-knowledge. This framework should be very simple (minimizing overhead) and flexible in terms of later expansion.

Go for it.

As a result of reading more advanced tutorials, notes of serious php-developers, different class structures (singletons, Singletons, dependency injection, JIT, ...), oop, mvc, routing, caching... and a lot more I find it very difficult to filter "the proper way" (if there is one) as it seems to me that everyone says something different.

That's because some people don't have an understanding why something should be solved in a certain way or why something is terrible practice, but they see something on some framework and they think it's the best thing since sliced bread.

Although opinions may differ, you cannot argue with clean code and proper OOP if that is what you are after. In proper OOP singletons and statics have no place. Also what most people call MVC is actually some wrong view on the pattern (mostly because again they have seen some framework do it some way). Which is not always bad, but it is not MVC.

Many people praise there opinon as "the best" and say that everything appart from that is evil. In my oppinion there is not a right or false. There are just several ways to achieve one's goal.

Not everything that isn't the best is terrible in my opinion. But some stuff is just bad practice. And some pattern are defined in a way to make your applications easier to maintain, debug and test. If you are going to implement some other pattern that's all fine with me, but you will loose the benefits of some other pattern.

Generally speaking the first rule of thumb I use when doing OOP programming is following the SOLID principles.

static classes: htmlManager, fileHandler, databaseManager, ...

These have no place in proper OOP. Amongst others because the will tightly coupling the classes. Which make maintainability, readability and testability a pain.

singletons: none

Good, because they are just a fancy global.

How do you organise/structure small or even bigger projects?

Separation of concerns in both code as structure. One of the pattern can help you with that: MVC, MVP, [MVVM](Model View ViewModel). For me personally I like the MVC pattern the most because it has some nice benefits against other patterns.

What are your experiences concerning simplicity, logic, performance, readability, expandability and reusability of code?

Readability and testablity are the most important. Right after that SOLID (which is also handled by the first point (overlap))

  1. Is there really a "proper way" of coding or it this just interpretation?
  2. Is there anything one should not use because it is already obsolete?
  3. Performance

Forget about a framework or php Don't do this, don't do that without naming the reason why

As I stated before: Just go for it. Do it and screw it up! Best way to learn is actually doing it and making terrible mistakes. I think the framework I made 1 year ago (although imho still better than 90% of what is out there) is a proper piece of crap ™.

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Many thanks for that great explanation. Exactly what I was looking for! –  F. Müller Jan 25 '13 at 13:49

How do you organise/structure small or even bigger projects?

Many PHP frameworks use the MVC structure.

What are your experiences concerning simplicity, logic, performance, readability, expandability and reusability of code?

Beside strict following of MVC I would suggest following principles like KISS and DRY. I would not consider performance as a high priority topic. You can get yourself familiar with caching strategies and good algorithms later (general topics, not PHP).

Is there really a "proper way" of coding or it this just interpretation?

There are some things that could be considered as best practice, you will find many hints on popular frameworks like Zend or symfony.

Is there anything one should not use because it is already obsolete?

You'll have to find out for yourself. You could skip writing a database handling and use ORM libraries like doctrine or propel. You could choose a special template engine for your view-representation like twig or smarty.

Don't do this, don't do that without naming the reason why

I think all long-time PHP programmers started their own framework at least once, there is no argument against it, especially not if you want to improve your knowledge.

share|improve this answer
    
@PeeHaa "because PHP is itself a templating engine" - this is exactly one of the reasons I want to have my own stuff . –  F. Müller Jan 25 '13 at 13:01
    
@unused What is your meaning about the class structure like singletons, static stuff etc? –  F. Müller Jan 25 '13 at 13:04
    
@PeeHaa any reasons why not to stick to an ORM? –  unused Jan 25 '13 at 13:09
    
@F.Müller you could make yourself familiar with design patterns, there are some very often used in PHP (like singleton or factory). The "static stuff etc." are basic OOP concepts, just read throught the object and classes part of the PHP documentation and dive deeper in every topic or concept you don't understand. –  unused Jan 25 '13 at 13:13
    
I do understand it. But I think the topic is to big to discuss. Thanks for your ideas. –  F. Müller Jan 25 '13 at 13:23

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