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I am working on integration testing some part of my code that creates directory trees under SVN. This requires me to test if the directory structure and the files within are what I expect them to be.

On one hand I have the expected directory tree with the files I want and on the other, an export of the files from SVN (prefer svn export over svn co to avoid the .svn noise).

However, is there any library that can assert two directory trees? The last resort I have in mind is to do an iterative comparison myself.

Basically I am looking for an API that can just accept two directories and tell me if they are equal or not.

Something on the lines of

boolean areDirectoriesEqual(File dir1, File dir2)
share|improve this question
    
so in summary, you have two directory structures with files and you want to compare the two structures together? – Moataz Elmasry Jan 25 '13 at 13:06
    
Yes. That's right. For now, I don't even care what the differences are. I just need to know if they are equal or not. – adarshr Jan 25 '13 at 13:08
1  
If you're using Java 7, perhaps you could create two FileVisitors and walk the trees? – hertzsprung Jan 27 '13 at 15:50

OK so I don't know of any ready piece of code that does that and search didn't help either. So here is how I would implement it

  1. iterate recursively on all folders and files
  2. save all file names with relative path from root in a hashset, where the relative path is the key/value
  3. iterate recursively on the second directory structure and create a from each path to match the keys in the hashet (if the folder/file exists)

If you just want to mark the tree as changed/not changed, you can save the hash of each file, then you need a hashmap instead of hashset, where the hash of the contents of each file is the value of the hashmap

hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the algorithm is alright. But I was mainly looking for a third party library that does all this. – adarshr Jan 25 '13 at 13:27
    
yes I understood your question, but as said I couldn't find anything as well :(, so.. – Moataz Elmasry Jan 25 '13 at 13:30

I am not aware of any areDirsEqual library; the closest I can think of is the listFiles method in Commons FileUtils.

If you put the resulting collections in a HashSet, you should be able to compare the two sets efficiently. And it can be done in 2 lines, maybe even a one-liner.

Something on this line:

public static boolean areDirsEqual(File dir, File dir2) {
  return (new HashSet<File>(FileUtils.listFiles(dir1,..))).
          containsAll(FileUtils.listFiles(dir2, ..))
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Yes. That is one way of verifying the structure. I guess it will do for now until I can find / write a comprehensive utility that can even handle diffs and highlight them. That's actually a good idea to start a new project on github! – adarshr Jan 25 '13 at 13:30
import java.io.File;

/**
 * 
 * FileUtils is a collection of routines for common file system operations.
 * 
 * @author Dan Jemiolo (danj)
 * 
 */

public final class FileUtils {

  /**
   * 
   * This is a convenience method that calls find(File, String, boolean) with
   * the last parameter set to "false" (does not match directories).
   * 
   * @see #find(File, String, boolean)
   * 
   */
  public static File find(File contextRoot, String fileName) {
    return find(contextRoot, fileName, false);
  }

  /**
   * 
   * Searches through the directory tree under the given context directory and
   * finds the first file that matches the file name. If the third parameter is
   * true, the method will also try to match directories, not just "regular"
   * files.
   * 
   * @param contextRoot
   *          The directory to start the search from.
   * 
   * @param fileName
   *          The name of the file (or directory) to search for.
   * 
   * @param matchDirectories
   *          True if the method should try and match the name against directory
   *          names, not just file names.
   * 
   * @return The java.io.File representing the <em>first</em> file or
   *         directory with the given name, or null if it was not found.
   * 
   */
  public static File find(File contextRoot, String fileName, boolean matchDirectories) {
    if (contextRoot == null)
      throw new NullPointerException("NullContextRoot");

    if (fileName == null)
      throw new NullPointerException("NullFileName");

    if (!contextRoot.isDirectory()) {
      Object[] filler = { contextRoot.getAbsolutePath() };
      String message = "NotDirectory";
      throw new IllegalArgumentException(message);
    }

    File[] files = contextRoot.listFiles();

    //
    // for all children of the current directory...
    //
    for (int n = 0; n < files.length; ++n) {
      String nextName = files[n].getName();

      //
      // if we find a directory, there are two possibilities:
      //
      // 1. the names match, AND we are told to match directories.
      // in this case we're done
      //
      // 2. not told to match directories, so recurse
      //
      if (files[n].isDirectory()) {
        if (nextName.equals(fileName) && matchDirectories)
          return files[n];

        File match = find(files[n], fileName);

        if (match != null)
          return match;
      }

      //
      // in the case of regular files, just check the names
      //
      else if (nextName.equals(fileName))
        return files[n];
    }

    return null;
  }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I don't think you understood my question. Doing a find is not what I want to do. – adarshr Jan 25 '13 at 13:02
1  
I am not searching for files within a directory here. All I want is a method like boolean areDirsEqual(File dir1, File dir2). – adarshr Jan 25 '13 at 13:07
    
See, you first store all the files in the File match for the 2 directories. Then you can compare the two matches – Aakash Anuj Jan 25 '13 at 13:09

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