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I am having a problem with:

>> parse [a / b] ['a '/ 'b]
** Syntax Error: Invalid word-lit -- '
** Near: (line 1) parse [a / b] ['a '/ 'b]
>>
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I'm not quite sure but I feel this is some sort of elaborate (or not) advertising scheme. –  Noon Silk Sep 21 '09 at 7:20
    
I'm not quite sure but I feel there is some sort of pananoïds :) –  Rebol Tutorial Sep 21 '09 at 18:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

REBOL's interpreter has some limitations on what you can happily write on the command line. You can't get a lit-word by writing '/ -- it throws an error because REBOL knows that / is the op! for division:

'/
** Syntax Error: Invalid word-lit -- '

But you can create '/ as a lit-word, starting with a string:

to-lit-word "/"
== '/

A solution to your code issue:

parse [a / b] compose ['a (to-lit-word "/") 'b]
=== true
  • compose [...] -- means we'll selectively evaluate part of the block before the parse
  • (...) -- is the part that is selectively evaluated, thus creating the desired '/ lit-word
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Great just need a refinement now see below :) –  Rebol Tutorial Sep 21 '09 at 22:13
    
See rather stackoverflow.com/questions/1458139/… because it's another question –  Rebol Tutorial Sep 22 '09 at 4:45
    
Nitpickin' here: but I think it's the special status of / for PATH! which probably breaks the parsing (as opposed to being the division operator). Note that you can literal quote other ops just fine e.g. '* or '+ ... –  HostileFork Apr 29 '11 at 10:33
    
Of course you can set up a specific rule: dvdr: reduce [to-lit-word "/"] and then use this in your main parse rule: ['a dvdr 'b] –  rgchris Jun 19 '11 at 22:55

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