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My problem is find a way to reduce the number of updateAccelerometer calls.

int count = 0;
int accelerometer = updateAccelerometer();
while (accelerometer <= 500) {
  printf("Actual: %lf", accelerometer);
  accelerometer = updateAccelerometer();
  count++;
}

Which gives:

Actual: 9
Actual: 28
Actual: 47
Actual: 65
Actual: 84
Actual: 103
Actual: 122
Actual: 141
Actual: 159
Actual: 178
Actual: 197
Actual: 216
Actual: 235
Actual: 253
Actual: 272
Actual: 291
Actual: 310
Actual: 329
Actual: 347
Actual: 366
Actual: 385
Actual: 404
Actual: 423
Actual: 442
Actual: 460
Actual: 479
Actual: 498

Now my problem is that I dont want to update the accelerometer every time, but in an exponential proportional ratio, for example. If I introduce a "linear proportional ratio"

I will just do:

if (count % 2 = 0) accelerometer = updateAccelerometer();

Which means, one value will be read, one value will not be, etc etc etc, since everytime I call updateAccelerometer it might take time, I would like to take less values when I am far away and more value when I am closer.

So the idea is to have an exponential function that will return me only the ones marked with x, not because I dont print the others, but because I dont update the accelerometer

Actual: 9
Actual: 28
Actual: 47
Actual: 65
Actual: 84
Actual: 103x
Actual: 122
Actual: 141
Actual: 159
Actual: 178
Actual: 197
Actual: 216
Actual: 235x
Actual: 253
Actual: 272
Actual: 291
Actual: 310
Actual: 329x
Actual: 347
Actual: 366
Actual: 385
Actual: 404x
Actual: 423
Actual: 442
Actual: 460x
Actual: 479
Actual: 498x

This is not a very specific problem, since I had this problem of exponentially skipping updates in many other situation, any tick?

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1  
Values 6,12,17,21,24,26 are not exponential. They are some kind of logarithmic function. –  banuj Jan 25 '13 at 13:37
    
The code shown passes the int accelerometer where printf expects a double to match the %lf specifier. This is incorrect and is not expected to work. It is unlikely the output shown is produced by the code shown. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 25 '13 at 14:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like the number of counts until you next sample the accelerator should be about sqrt(fabs(500 - accelerometer)) / 3.25.

share|improve this answer
    
will this work if one day I implement a faster or a slower accelerator ? how did you derive that 3.25 ? –  haskellguy Jan 25 '13 at 14:10
    
anyway, the number of counts is not proportional to the accelerometer –  haskellguy Jan 25 '13 at 14:18
    
@haskellguy: I just worked backwards, fitting a curve to your data. And it's not proportional to the accelerometer; the difference in counts is proportional to (a power of) how far away the accelerometer is from its target value. In this case the power 0.5 seemed to fit your desired curve. –  caf Jan 25 '13 at 14:18
    
Oh I see what you mean now. But now, the implementation would be writing if (sqrt(fabs(500 - accelerometer)) / 3.25 == ????) update&print –  haskellguy Jan 25 '13 at 14:24
    
@haskellguy: The == ???? would be <= count - last_update_count, and you'd set last_update_count = count; when you do the update. –  caf Jan 25 '13 at 14:35

There are lots of ways you can do it! Set with predefined iteration indexes when the data should be printed, some kind of mathematical function to determine it.

I however would go with something like this:

int count = 0;
int timeToPrint = 5;
int timeSincePrinted = 0;
int minPrintSpan = 2;
int accelerometer = updateAccelerometer();
while (accelerometer <= 500) {
  timeSincePrinted++;
  if (timeToPrint == timeSincePrinted && timeSincePrinted >= minPrintSpan) {
    printf("Actual: %lf and %d", accelerometer, count);
    timeSincePrinted=0;
    timeToPrint--;
  }
  accelerometer = updateAccelerometer();
  count++;
}

That wat you have a fairly simple, low-complexity and easily tunable functionality. Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
This is cool, but probably I express wrongly the idea. I want to print & updateAccelerometer() exponentially (given that I can predict the linear increase of the accelerometer). I think a quick fix would be to include accelerometer in the if statement, however, this will not be dependent from the accelerometer counting –  haskellguy Jan 25 '13 at 14:12

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