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We have some intervals for example [1;4] [7;13] [9;14] inputs should return 3+6+1=10. Is there any way using segment trees to find the total length of these intervals when the intervals can be dynamically inserted or deleted?

P.S.: I thought of doing this without using segment tree but the time complexity doesn't satisfy me.

thank you in advance

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1  
How many intervals you have and max min position and length of iterval. How many requests to get total sum, how many inserts? – Толя Jan 25 '13 at 13:44
1  
are intervals sorted as in your example? – Andy T Jan 25 '13 at 13:45
    
@AndyT yeah i can sort them first – CoderInNetwork Jan 25 '13 at 14:04
    
the intervals can insert or delete dynamically. – CoderInNetwork Jan 25 '13 at 14:06

lets assume that the intervals are stored in a array[m,n]. another assumption is that the array is sorted.

all you need to do is find the smaller difference:

 int totalIntervales = 0;
 for(int index = 0; index < array.length ; index++)
 {
     int currentIntrval = array[index, 1] - array[index, 0];
     int differnceFromPrevious = array[index, 1] - array[index- 1, 1]
     totalIntervale += currentIntrval  > differnceFromPrevious ? differnceFromPrevious : currentIntrval;
 }
 return totalIntervale;

just handle the 0 location carefully.

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I think your algorithm has a bug when the second interval is completely contained within the first. Consider the set [1,4][2,3]. Your algorithm would say the interval is 2. The fix would be to check that differenceFromPrevious is non-negative. Otherwise, it appears to work. (edit because I forgot hitting 'enter' would commit the comment) – James May 5 '14 at 20:06
    
Actually, upon further thought, I don't think your algorithm works very well. Take the case of [1, 5][1, 2][2, 4]. Your algorithm would report 4 - 3 + 2 = 3. – James May 5 '14 at 20:15

The Kobi/Maureinik answer was very close, but I had to add a variable for maxEnd and check that differenceFromPrevious was non-negative. The algorithm still assumes that the ranges are sorted on the start element (ie. array[i, 0])

int totalInterval = array[0, 1] - array[0, 0];
int maxEnd = array[0, 1];
for(int index = 1; index < array.length ; index++) {
  int currentIntrval = array[index, 1] - array[index, 0];
  int differnceFromPrevious = array[index, 1] - maxEnd;
  if(differenceFromPrevious >= 0) {
    totalInterval += (currentIntrval > differnceFromPrevious) ? differnceFromPrevious : currentIntrval;
  }
  maxEnd = (maxEnd >= array[index, 1]) ? maxEnd : array[index, 1];
}
return totalInterval;

Edit: fixed accidental copy of original totalInterval logic that did not work. If differenceFromPrevoius < 0, then totalInterval should be left alone.

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