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Im trying to avoid a character to appear more than once in a string. In this case I need a Comma to appear only once in a bunch of numbers.

Correct matchs:

,111111
11111,1111
11111,

Incorrect matchs:

1111,,11111
11,111,111
share|improve this question
1  
What language do you use? – pstr Jan 25 '13 at 13:33
    
is 111 a valid expression for your "language" or not? – Giwrgos _ Jan 25 '13 at 14:02

Try this

(?im)^[0-9]*,[0-9]*$

or, more accurately

(?im)^([0-9]*,[0-9]+|[0-9]+,[0-9]*)$

Explanation

<!--
(?im)^([0-9]*,[0-9]+|[0-9]+,[0-9]*)$

Match the remainder of the regex with the options: case insensitive (i); ^ and $ match at line breaks (m) «(?im)»
Assert position at the beginning of a line (at beginning of the string or after a line break character) «^»
Match the regular expression below and capture its match into backreference number 1 «([0-9]*,[0-9]+|[0-9]+,[0-9]*)»
   Match either the regular expression below (attempting the next alternative only if this one fails) «[0-9]*,[0-9]+»
      Match a single character in the range between “0” and “9” «[0-9]*»
         Between zero and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «*»
      Match the character “,” literally «,»
      Match a single character in the range between “0” and “9” «[0-9]+»
         Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «+»
   Or match regular expression number 2 below (the entire group fails if this one fails to match) «[0-9]+,[0-9]*»
      Match a single character in the range between “0” and “9” «[0-9]+»
         Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «+»
      Match the character “,” literally «,»
      Match a single character in the range between “0” and “9” «[0-9]*»
         Between zero and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «*»
Assert position at the end of a line (at the end of the string or before a line break character) «$»
-->
share|improve this answer
    
@Giwrgos_: It looks okay to me. [0-9]+ matches one or more digits, and the OP's examples all have exactly one comma. The (?im) isn't doing anything useful, but it doesn't hurt either. – Alan Moore Jan 25 '13 at 14:15
    
You are right...my bad.Sorry.The only matter is that both your expressions need a comma to accept a word.If 111 is valid expression then none expression will accept it.Sorry again. – Giwrgos _ Jan 25 '13 at 14:37

if you want to include 1111 as correct then go with something like this:

^[0-9]*,?[0-9]*$  

if not...use:

^[0-9]*,[0-9]*$  

explanation:

^ = start of string  
[0-9]* = zero numbers or multiple numbers  
,? = a comma zero or 1 time  
,(without the ? following) = a comma must be here 
$ = the end of string

Nice site to check expressions
http://regexpal.com/
(make sure to check "^$ match at line breaks" on top and press Enter at the end of each line )

share|improve this answer
    
Note that your first regex allows empty string, and your second regex allow a lone comma. – nhahtdh Jan 25 '13 at 14:54
    
Right...if this is undesired then Cylian's accurate answer ^([0-9]*,[0-9]+|[0-9]+,[0-9]*)$ with a questionmark ? after the comma, if needed, is the answer. – Giwrgos _ Jan 25 '13 at 15:45

In Java it can be done by using the following method (w/o using regex) since we have to check only one character.

private static boolean checkValidity(String str, char charToCheck) {
    int count = 0;
    char[] chars = str.toCharArray();
    for (char ch : chars) {
        if (ch == ',' && ++count > 1) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

Use it as follows:

public static void main(String args[]) {
    System.out.println(checkValidity("111,111,111", ','));
    System.out.println(checkValidity("111,,111", ','));
    System.out.println(checkValidity("111,111", ','));
}

The output would be:

false
false
true

as you required.

share|improve this answer
1  
And you think this is preferable to a regex? Anyway, the OP did specify that the rest of the characters have to be digits, so you have to look at all of them. – Alan Moore Jan 25 '13 at 14:21
    
AFAIK regex is slower and the OP never said he had to check for numbers just that he wants to check the commas in a bunch of numbers. – aa8y Jan 25 '13 at 18:42
    
Regexes are not slow--at least, not slow enough to matter. Avoiding regexes because someone told you they're slow is just another form of premature optimization. Individual expressions may run very slowly indeed, but that's the author's fault, not the tool's. – Alan Moore Jan 25 '13 at 20:58

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