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The problem I'm trying to solve: calculate the current average velocity of some data series where the data points are unevenly spread. For example, calculating the current speed of an upload, where the 'amount uploaded' signals arrive unevenly:

  • t = 0, sent = 0
  • t = 5, sent = 10
  • t = 6, sent = 12
  • t = 9, sent = 20
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When you say smoothing, do you want a piecewise linear thing, or do you want a smooth result? – YXD Jan 25 '13 at 14:06
1  
Do you have some problem with using some of the, relatively basic, methods in eckner.com/papers/ts_alg.pdf ? – mmgp Jan 25 '13 at 15:03
(last - first) / (time delta between first and last)

And that would be exactly the average velocity.

Unsless you forgot to tell us some details, you do not need the data points in the middle.

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Maybe "last - first"? – Толя Jan 25 '13 at 14:09
    
Sorry, I think I wasn't clear enough -- it should be a moving average, showing the speed as it is now. A real world example: you get half way through an upload and then your connection drops out. The displayed value should quickly show "0". – nickf Jan 25 '13 at 14:10
    
@Толя - Ah, yes, exactly. – Rogach Jan 25 '13 at 14:10
    
@nickf - Then it's a little more complex. For example, you could decide that you'll take only the last 20 seconds of input, and average on that period - it would get to zero in 20 seconds after the connection drop. – Rogach Jan 25 '13 at 14:11

You can calculate the average per time unit by taking the delta of the new values and the previous values.

And if you want the average over multiple points, you can calculate the averages between several points, and than take the average of those averages.

For example:

Current average:
t34       =  9 -  6 = 3
sent34    = 20 - 12 = 8
average34 = 8 / 3 = 2.67

Average of last two time slots:
t23       =  6 -  5 = 1
sent23    = 12 - 10 = 2
average23 = 2 / 1 = 2

average234 = (2 + 2.67) / 2 = 2.33
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Just rescale latest results

For you example:

t = 0, sent = 0
t = 5, sent = 10
t = 6, sent = 12
t = 9, sent = 20

CurrentSpeed = (20 -12) / (9 - 6) = 8/3 = 2.666666

You may use different rescale interval size to decrease speed of changing velocity (when connection "lost" "restored")

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The standard way of calculating a velocity from noisy data is to apply a Kalman filter.

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