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I have a Git repository, and I need to write a post-receive script that checkouts two branches into two separate directories and then performs some actions. I have the following script that works for one branch, but I'm not sure how to script it so that it checks out two branches.

#!/bin/sh

GIT_REPO="$HOME/oliverjash.me.git"
TMP_GIT_CLONE="$HOME/tmp/oliverjash.me"
PUBLIC_WWW="/var/www/oliverjash.me"

# Clone & Checkout a copy of this repository somewhere
git clone $GIT_REPO $TMP_GIT_CLONE

# Do other actions
cd $TMP_GIT_CLONE
compass compile -e $RAKE_ENV -c config.rb --force
jekyll $PUBLIC_WWW
cd $HOME
rm -rf $TMP_GIT_CLONE
exit

Bear in mind that the "actions" I need to do to each copy will be the same except for the variables, of course – I would really like to avoid repeating code.

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You would probably be better off having some other service do the work and just signal that service in the hook. –  Andrew Myers Jan 25 '13 at 15:10
    
What like? I'm not sure if I understand. –  Oliver Joseph Ash Jan 25 '13 at 15:10
    
Depending on how complex what you need to do is something like Jenkins will do what you want and is fairly simple to set up. –  Andrew Myers Jan 29 '13 at 15:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If use a shell that supports functions, you could create a function that takes the clone directory as an argument. You would just invoke the function twice, once for each clone directory. (This is assuming that you meant clone where you said checkout above, since I do not see a git checkout in your example.)

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How do you clone a specific branch? I only need a copy of the files, I don't need the repository data, so that's why I wasn't sure whether I needed to clone or checkout. –  Oliver Joseph Ash Jan 26 '13 at 11:18
    
You can only clone a whole repository with Git. –  Mark Leighton Fisher Jan 27 '13 at 2:38

It's not perfect but in the end I came up with this.

#!/bin/bash --login

GIT_REPO="$HOME/oliverjash.me.git"

source "$HOME/.bash_profile"

checkout () {
  BRANCH="$1"
  TMP_GIT_CLONE="$2"
  PUBLIC_WWW="$3"

  git clone $GIT_REPO $TMP_GIT_CLONE
  cd $TMP_GIT_CLONE
  git checkout $BRANCH
  compass compile -e $RAKE_ENV -c config.rb --force
  jekyll $PUBLIC_WWW
  cd $HOME
  rm -rf $TMP_GIT_CLONE
}

checkout master "$HOME/tmp/oliverjash.me" "/var/www/oliverjash.me"
checkout project "$HOME/tmp/project.oliverjash.me" "/var/www/project.oliverjash.me"

exit

I don't like how it recompiles every branch, even if changes have only been pushed to one, but it's good enough.

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