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I want to create a class which has a static method that returns a reference to a static variable(which is declared inside the method). What I want is when calling the method to get the reference of the static variable. Then when I modify it outside the class and call the method again to get the same value I previously set.

Here's what I tried:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
    static int& f()
    {
        static int i;
        return i;
    }
};

int main()
{
    static int i;
    i = A::f();

    cout << i << endl;

    i = 11;
    cout << i << endl;

    i = A::f();
    cout << i << endl;

    return 0;
}

The problem is that the output of this code is:

0
11
0
Press <RETURN> to close this window...

Why doesn't it return 0, 11, 11 and how can I make it return 0, 11, 11?

Note: I want the static variable to be explicitly declared inside the method and not as member.

Thanks!

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2  
You never do A::f()=something; –  Marc Glisse Jan 25 '13 at 14:25
    
Why not? Tried and works great... –  Jacob Krieg Jan 26 '13 at 20:33
    
"You never do" as in "you forgot to do", not as in "you must not do". –  Marc Glisse Jan 26 '13 at 20:46
    
you mean it's bad practice?....i saw similar code in a very large production application i'm working on, this is why i'm asking. –  Jacob Krieg Jan 26 '13 at 20:48
    
No! As I tried to explain in the last message, you are misunderstanding my English. It is a good thing to write A::f()=3. The program in your question was bad because it didn't contain any such statement. –  Marc Glisse Jan 26 '13 at 20:51
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To have the local variable i refer to the same variable inside the function, declare it as a reference:

static int& i = A::f();

Otherwise, you're just creating a new variable and using assigning A::f() to it.

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This is because you copy the value returned by reference into a regular variable: when you store int& in an int, it is no longer a reference.

What you should do instead is

int &i = A::f();

Note that the local i needs not be static: reference to static data can be stored in automatic variables without a problem.

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It needs to be an int& in main, if you want changes to that int to be changes to the int referred to by the return value of f.

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You may want to initailce your variable. And you can use it directly or you may want to "conserv" the reference in a local reference. But you can not reasign these local references. For example:

int main()
{
    A::f()=3;
    cout << A::f() << endl;

    static int &i = A::f();
    cout << i << endl;

    i = 11;
    cout << i << endl;

    cout << A::f() << endl;

    int &ii = A::f();
    cout << ii << endl;

    return 0;
}
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thanks very much –  Jacob Krieg Jan 25 '13 at 14:43
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