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I have a problem with z-indexes in Chrome. The orange div should go behind the black div. and it does, except in Chrome. Can anyone help? here is the situation:

.page {
    height:900px;
    background:orange;
    width:80%;
    position:relative;
    z-index:8;
    top:120px;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/yXTF6/4/

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1  
i got same output in chrome and firefox –  krish Jan 25 '13 at 14:54
    
also opera and ie –  dmi3y Jan 25 '13 at 14:56
    
I'm using chrome version 24.0.1312.56 –  zzzzzzzzz Jan 25 '13 at 15:01
    
my version also same 24.0.1312.56 –  krish Jan 25 '13 at 15:15
    
than you can see that the orange div is going over the black div, and in firefox it's going underneath it. –  zzzzzzzzz Jan 25 '13 at 15:19

2 Answers 2

you are setting the z-index in the top-img class, but you should do it in the background class

if the background class per se is not above the others, you can not fix this in the descendant of the class, in anyway.

Editing:

here is the fiddle

 [http://jsfiddle.net/vals/cTf72/]

I just added to .background the z-index: 9 that was in the .top-img

top, page and background are siblings, and so they "compete" between them for the z-index. But once one of them is choosen, all their descendants go in the same pack, so to say. It is useless to set a z-index in top-img, because it has no siblings to compete with, and can not alter the z-index of the parent (background)

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Can you post the code or a fiddle if you have a solution? –  zzzzzzzzz Jan 25 '13 at 15:36
    
the orange div needs to be between the black and the wood. If you set z-index:9 to background it's behind both, so you can't see it at all. jsfiddle.net/cTf72/1 –  zzzzzzzzz Jan 25 '13 at 20:26
    
I understood that the orange should be behind the black one, but in the original post you didn't say anything about being in front of the wooden one. The black and the wooden are in the same conext, and different from the orange one. It can't be done; sorry –  vals Jan 25 '13 at 21:19
    
That would be ok except it is doable except in Chrome. More precisely in newer Chromes. I tested it in Chrome 20 and it worked. –  zzzzzzzzz Jan 25 '13 at 23:50

As @vals mentioned in his answer it isn't possible with the markup you were using. So I decided to adjust that and show you how it could work.

If you remove the <div class="background"> that you had wrapping the black bar and the image then you can get the page to work how you want. I adjusted the classes for both the black bar <div> and the <img> so that it still had the same effect you had earlier.

Here is a link to the jsfiddle.

Here's updated markup and CSS.

<div class='top-img background'></div>
<img class="background" src="https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSJGQ7eqRuhZQqbX1roKW8zBGVHW-VlmQq0uTGCZjDGDHCRljPp" />
<div class='top'>
</div>
<div class='page'>
</div>

And the CSS

.background {
    position:fixed;
    width:100%;
}
.top-img {
    height:100px;
    background:black;
    z-index:9;
}
img {
    width:100%;
    z-index:7;
    top : 100px;
}
.top {
    position:fixed;
    width:60%;
    height:60px;
    top:60px;
    background:yellow;
    z-index:10;
}
.page {
    height:900px;
    background:orange;
    width:80%;
    position:relative;
    z-index:8;
    top:120px;
}
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I'm using this markup because the black div in the actual case is a picture set to 100% width so the height is changing depending on the window with, so I can't set the height because it changes. I could use this markup and set the img top by javascript but I would rather not. –  zzzzzzzzz Jan 26 '13 at 11:08

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