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The 2011 C++ Standard states in section 11.4 that

An additional access check beyond those described earlier in Clause 11 is applied when a non-static data member or non-static member function is a protected member of its naming class ( 11.2 ) 115 As described earlier, access to a protected member is granted because the reference occurs in a friend or member of some class C . If the access is to form a pointer to member ( 5.3.1 ), the nested-name-specifier shall denote C or a class derived from C . All other accesses involve a (possibly implicit) object expression ( 5.2.5 ). In this case, the class of the object expression shall be C or a class derived from C .

(In the old standard, similar wording was in section 11.5.)

This rule restricts the oft-repeated idea that "protected members of B can be accessed by any B or derived class of B." Interpreting the rule, however, is difficult, as evidenced by the fact that different current compilers enforce the rule differently.

See, for example, this test code. I compiled this code using Apple LLVM Compiler 4.1, GCC 4.7.2, and Visual Studio 2010. There are similarities as well as differences in the errors they report.

class Base
{
protected:
    int A;
};

class Derived : public Base
{
protected:
    int B;
};

class Grandchild : public Derived
{
    void access_protected(Base* b, Derived* d,
                          Grandchild* g, class GreatGrandchild* gg );
};

class GreatGrandchild : public Grandchild {};

void Grandchild::access_protected(Base* b, Derived* d,
                                  Grandchild* g, GreatGrandchild* gg )
{
    int* p;

    Base lb;
    Derived ld;
    Grandchild lg;
    GreatGrandchild lgg;

    A = 1;              // Legal...
    B = 2;

    Base::A = 1;
    Derived::B = 2;

    b->A = 1;           // Illegal ALL
    p = &(b->A);        // Illegal ALL
    lb.A = 1;           // Illegal ALL
    p = &(lb.A);        // Illegal ALL

    d->A = 1;           // Illegal GCC, VS
    p = &(d->A);        // Illegal GCC, VS
    ld.A = 1;           // Illegal GCC, VS
    p = &(ld.A);        // Illegal GCC, VS
    d->B = 2;           // Illegal ALL
    p = &(d->B);        // Illegal ALL
    ld.B = 2;           // Illegal ALL
    p = &(ld.B);        // Illegal ALL

    g->A = 1;           // Legal...
    g->B = 2;
    lg.A = 1;
    lg.B = 2;

    gg->A = 1;
    gg->B = 2;
    lgg.A = 1;
    lgg.B = 2;
}

From these results I glean that: (1) it's always okay to access protected members of your own class and your derived classes; (2) it's always illegal to access protected members of the base class in which they were declared, except from that class; (3) although the standard takes care to distinguish between pointers to members and "object expressions", both the standard and the compilers give them the same restrictions; (4) it's unclear whether it's legal to access a protected member of an "intermediate" base class (Derived in the example) for which the member was declared in the intermediate's base.

The confusion, then, is whether it's okay for me to talk about my grandparent's protected member as owned by my parent. No double entendre intended.

(I'm ignoring friends for simplicity and sanity's sake.)

Since protected is such a fundamental part of the language, I am motivated to understand it well. Please:

  1. Based on your interpretation of the standard, which compiler implements this correctly?
  2. What is the rationale for the overall restriction? Why can't I access base classes' protected members freely? What concrete error is it designed to avoid? Do you know of an online discussion—ideally as held by the standards committee—that explores this rationale?
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1  
Derived is a private base class of Grandchild? –  Chubsdad Jan 25 '13 at 14:56
2  
You are deriving Grandchild from Derived privately (classes default to private inheritance when no qualifier is used). I am not sure if that was your intent. –  Andrei Tita Jan 25 '13 at 14:56
    
To make your classes more human readable/understandable, you should always explicity add the private keyword in your inheritance chain so that everyone will know your intent, regardless of the fact that the compiler defaults to private for class inheritance. –  franji1 Jan 25 '13 at 16:21
    
Whether the inheritance is private or public has no effect in this case. –  OldPeculier Jan 25 '13 at 22:00

3 Answers 3

I would say that GCC and Visual Studio are correct.

Given the following situation:

class Base
{
protected:
  int A;
};

class Derived : public Base
{
protected:
  int B;
};

class OtherGrandchild : Derived
{
};

class Grandchild : Derived
{
  void access_protected(OtherGrandchild* otherGrandchild);
};

void Grandchild::access_protected(OtherGrandchild* otherGrandchild)
{
  otherGrandchild->A = 1; // Should be illegal
  otherGrandchild->B = 1; // Should be illegal

  Derived* derived = static_cast<Derived*>(otherGrandchild);

  derived->A = 1; // Should still be illegal
  derived->B = 1; // Should still be illegal
}

If you were not restricted you could alter the otherwise private members of OtherGrandchild from Grandchild just by casting to a common base type. That sort of access should only be allowable through friend declarations.

I'm not sure of any discussions on the topic but that would be my interpretation of it.

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The reason for this is that a derived object D can only access protected members of the base , using an object expression that is either D or another class Derived from D.

The Standard does not allow D to access protected members of another object using an object expression of type B

That's what exactly (OK roughly) what the above quote is trying to say.

class base
{
protected:
   int x;
};

class derived : public base
{
public:
   void f(base *p)   
   {
      x = 2;     // good
      p->x = 3;  // not good. base is not 'derived' nor derived from 'derived'
   }
};

int main() { }

Think about it for a moment. Public member of base B are accessible in any derived class D. Private members of B are not accessible in any derived class D. It is only the protected members that require some consideration. And the above quote from the Standard spells out that consideration. Protected non static members of B can be accessed in a derived class D only using an object expression which is of type D or a type derived further from D

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I can't cite a reference or authoritative source, but it looks to me like g++ and VS are both correct here (for the first time ever they agree?) because it simply doesn't make logical sense that an empty intermediate injected class could change the access control of a parent's protected data.

As for the rationale, it's almost certainly because the less restrictive you make protected the more like public it becomes (it already has a lot of similarities to public in that you just have to derive a class to gain unrestricted access to the parent innards). If you start allowing child classes that aren't even your same instance to manipulate your state, the chances of violating class invariants increases significantly.

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