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I'm trying to learn that if I have to add export statement to set a variable in a bash_profile file . How would I do that ? For example if I have to add export AX = 'name' then should I simply write it at the end of file or do I need to write anything else as well

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quick note: do not put any kind of whitespace after/before the equal sign –  Carlos Campderrós Jan 25 '13 at 15:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Simply write export AS='name' anywhere in your ~/.bash_profile file:

# Append to the end of the file
$ echo "export AS='name'" >> ~/.bash_profile

# Update shell 
$ source ~/.bash_profile

This first command adds the line you want to the file (or just use a text editor) the second updates the shells with the new variable.

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There are 2 scenarios:

1. Exporting an independent variable

For example if you want to export variable "AX" independently then use:

AX = 'name'
export AX

2. Exporting an independent variable followed by appending it to some existing variable

For example if you want to export variable "AX" independently followed by appending it to the class path then use:

AX = 'name'
export AX
PATH=$PATH:AX
export PATH
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Typically, variables are declared and defined in one place and exported in another:

AX='name'
export AX
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That exported variable has already been created . Should I just write export AX ='hostname' so that it gets set to this every time I login or still write the above way –  Lost Jan 25 '13 at 15:15
    
where is it created? if in your .bash_profile, then just change the place where it is defined. If not, then your ~/.bash_profile is the last one executed (at least in standard configuration) so just put it at the end of the file. (make sure it is after anything else that might be sourced) –  Lucas Jan 25 '13 at 15:21

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