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Code:

static void MultipleFilesToSingleFile(string dirPath, string filePattern, string destFile)
{
    string[] fileAry = Directory.GetFiles(dirPath, filePattern);

    Console.WriteLine("Total File Count : " + fileAry.Length);

    using (TextWriter tw = new StreamWriter(destFile, true))
    {
        foreach (string filePath in fileAry)
        {
            using (TextReader tr = new StreamReader(filePath))
            {
                tw.WriteLine(tr.ReadToEnd());
                tr.Close();
                tr.Dispose();
            }
            Console.WriteLine("File Processed : " + filePath);
        }

        tw.Close();
        tw.Dispose();
    }
}

I need to optimize this as its extremely slow: takes 3 minutes for 45 files of average size 40 — 50 Mb XML file.

Please note: 45 files of an average 45 MB is just one example, it can be n numbers of files of m size, where n is in thousands & m can be of average 128 Kb. In short, it can vary.

Could you please provide any views on optimization?

share|improve this question
3  
45 files of an average 45MB each is a total of just over 2GB. How long do you expect that to take? Disk I/O will account for a large chunk of the time it's taking. – Ken White Jan 25 '13 at 15:32
2  
Calling Dispose is superfluous as the objects you're disposing are already in a using block (which will take care of Dispose for you). – Tim Jan 25 '13 at 15:32
1  
You're loading in memory each file. Such big strings will go in the large objects heap, why don't you read smaller chunks of data (reusing the buffer)? Close/Dispose are useless because of the using statement. A raw Stream is enough because you do not handle/change any encoding. After done all of this...you'll see performance won't be changed too much because probably most of the time is spent in I/O. If output file isn't on the same disk as inputs then you may even try to make reading and writing asynchronous (pre-read next file/chunk when writing). – Adriano Repetti Jan 25 '13 at 15:39
1  
@Pratik one last note: if you may have 1000+ files you may consider to use Directory.EnumerateFiles instead of Directory.GetFiles. For the same reason I suggest you check the file size to decide which copy method is better (one single big read or multiple small chunks). Finally do not use helper function AppendAllText: it opens and close the file for each writing. – Adriano Repetti Jan 25 '13 at 16:17
1  
@Pratik no, most of time is spent on (slow) disk I/O, you won't gain anything to use unsafe code. It's better to just refactor your code to do not waste memory/CPU and improve algorithm (ok, even multithreading for I/O is somehow empirical). Well, you may consider to rewrite your code to use ReadFileScatter and WriteFileGather but frankly speaking I don't know how much performance boost you'll have (compared to the effort to use them, at least until very high speed SSDs will be common enough). – Adriano Repetti Jan 25 '13 at 16:44
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Why not just use the Stream.CopyTo() method?

private static void CombineMultipleFilesIntoSingleFile(string inputDirectoryPath, string inputFileNamePattern, string outputFilePath)
{
    string[] inputFilePaths = Directory.GetFiles(inputDirectoryPath, inputFileNamePattern);
    Console.WriteLine("Number of files: {0}.", inputFilePaths.Length);
    using (var outputStream = File.Create(outputFilePath))
    {
        foreach (var inputFilePath in inputFilePaths)
        {
            using (var inputStream = File.OpenRead(inputFilePath))
            {
                // Buffer size can be passed as the second argument.
                inputStream.CopyTo(outputStream);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("The file {0} has been processed.", inputFilePath);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

One option is to utilize the copy command, and let it do what is does well.

Something like:

static void MultipleFilesToSingleFile(string dirPath, string filePattern, string destFile)
{
    var cmd = new ProcessStartInfo("cmd.exe", 
        String.Format("/c copy {0} {1}", filePattern, destFile));
    cmd.WorkingDirectory = dirPath;
    cmd.UseShellExecute = false;
    Process.Start(cmd);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Will this work? My requirement is, I have directory it has 100 of files, 50 of them *.xml ones I need to combine all of them under one file.Will the above thing work for me? – Pratik Jan 25 '13 at 16:12
    
Oops then I guess this NOT what I'm looking for! By the if it copies all contents of file to a single file.It may work for me, Is that the casE? – Pratik Jan 25 '13 at 16:14
1  
Just add the /b switch to force copy to treat them as binary files (then it'll append them). If you need a command line solution this is good (it's not the best solution from performance point of view but the effort to make this good is pretty high). – Adriano Repetti Jan 25 '13 at 16:55
1  
@Eren: I stand corrected. This must be a change in cmd.exe I hadn't caught. I'll remove my comments - luckily I didn't downvote. :-) Thanks for the correction; I always like learning things, even if I'm proven wrong in the process. (And +1, while I'm at it.) – Ken White Jan 25 '13 at 18:34
2  
This is a LAME approach. I doubt it it would fare better than OP's code, it involves launching a new process which may have overhead, there's no decent error handling option (exit code is not a good option). Besides that it looks archaic. Lame. – Sten Petrov Jan 25 '13 at 22:03

I would use a BlockingCollection to read so you can read and write concurrently.
Clearly should write to a separate physical disk to avoid hardware contention. This code will preserve order.
Read is going to be faster than write so no need for parallel read.
Again since read is going to be faster limit the size of the collection so read does not get farther ahead of write than it needs to.
A simple task to read the single next in parallel while writing the current has the problem of different file sizes - write a small file is faster than read a big.

I use this pattern to read and parse text on T1 and then insert to SQL on T2.

public void WriteFiles()
{
    using (BlockingCollection<string> bc = new BlockingCollection<string>(10))
    {
        // play with 10 if you have several small files then a big file
        // write can get ahead of read if not enough are queued

        TextWriter tw = new StreamWriter(@"c:\temp\alltext.text", true);
        // clearly you want to write to a different phyical disk 
        // ideally write to solid state even if you move the files to regular disk when done
        // Spin up a Task to populate the BlockingCollection
        using (Task t1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            string dir = @"c:\temp\";
            string fileText;      
            int minSize = 100000; // play with this
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(minSize);
            string[] fileAry = Directory.GetFiles(dir, @"*.txt");
            foreach (string fi in fileAry)
            {
                Debug.WriteLine("Add " + fi);
                fileText = File.ReadAllText(fi);
                //bc.Add(fi);  for testing just add filepath
                if (fileText.Length > minSize)
                {
                    if (sb.Length > 0)
                    { 
                       bc.Add(sb.ToString());
                       sb.Clear();
                    }
                    bc.Add(fileText);  // could be really big so don't hit sb
                }
                else
                {
                    sb.Append(fileText);
                    if (sb.Length > minSize)
                    {
                        bc.Add(sb.ToString());
                        sb.Clear();
                    }
                }
            }
            if (sb.Length > 0)
            {
                bc.Add(sb.ToString());
                sb.Clear();
            }
            bc.CompleteAdding();
        }))
        {

            // Spin up a Task to consume the BlockingCollection
            using (Task t2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                string text;
                try
                {
                    while (true)
                    {
                        text = bc.Take();
                        Debug.WriteLine("Take " + text);
                        tw.WriteLine(text);                  
                    }
                }
                catch (InvalidOperationException)
                {
                    // An InvalidOperationException means that Take() was called on a completed collection
                    Debug.WriteLine("That's All!");
                    tw.Close();
                    tw.Dispose();
                }
            }))

                Task.WaitAll(t1, t2);
        }
    }
}

BlockingCollection Class

share|improve this answer
    
If input and output come from the same disk then each read will have to wait (or it'll be slow because of) the writing... – Adriano Repetti Jan 25 '13 at 16:21
    
too much code for too little of a task. multithreading won't help split the disk RW head in two – Sten Petrov Jan 25 '13 at 22:05
    
@StenPetrov What part of "Clearly should write to a separate physical disk to avoid hardware contention" was not clear? – Paparazzi Jan 25 '13 at 22:25
    
@Blam so on top of what you wrote here we'll have to write another piece that writes to a single disk? – Sten Petrov Jan 25 '13 at 22:31
    
@StenPetrov Code does not fail on a single disk. With read and write caching it will probably even get some parallel. I would not optimize differently for a single disk. So you would do it differently - that is clear from your answer. – Paparazzi Jan 25 '13 at 23:22

Several things you can do:

  • I my experience the default buffer sizes can be increased with noticeable benefit up to about 120K, I suspect setting a large buffer on all streams will be the easiest and most noticeable performance booster:

    new System.IO.FileStream("File.txt", System.IO.FileMode.Open, System.IO.FileAccess.Read, System.IO.FileShare.Read, 150000);
    
  • Use the Stream class, not the StreamReader class.

  • Read contents into a large buffer, dump them in output stream at once — this will speed up small files operations.
  • No need of the redundant close/dispose: you have the using statement.
share|improve this answer

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