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I am using a terminal emulator library to create a terminal and then I use it to send the data entered over serial to a serial device. The library can be seen here.

When I enter data into the terminal a strange series of characters is being sent/received. I think the unicode replacement character gets sent over serial, the serial device doesnt know what it is and returns ~0.

Screenshot of what appears in the terminal when i write "test": enter image description here

And the log showing the strings sent and the data received. http://i.imgur.com/x79aPzv.png

I create an EmulatorView, it's the terminal view. it mentions the diamonds here.

private void sendText(CharSequence text) {
                int n = text.length();
                char c;
                try {
                    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
                        c = text.charAt(i);
                        if (Character.isHighSurrogate(c)) {
                            int codePoint;
                            if (++i < n) {
                                codePoint = Character.toCodePoint(c, text.charAt(i));
                            } else {
                                // Unicode Replacement Glyph, aka white question mark in black diamond.
                                codePoint = '\ufffd';
                            }
                            mapAndSend(codePoint);
                        } else {
                            mapAndSend(c);
                        }
                    }
                } catch (IOException e) {
                    Log.e(TAG, "error writing ", e);
                }
            }

Is there any way to fix this? Can anybody see in the library class why this is happening?, How can I refer to � in java to even parse it out if I wanted to? I can't say if (!str.contains("�") I take it.

When I type in the terminal this is run:

public void write(byte[] bytes, int offset, int count) {


 String str;
try {
    str = new String(bytes, "UTF-8");
      Log.d(TAG, "data received in write: " +str );

      GraphicsTerminalActivity.sendOverSerial(str.getBytes("UTF-8"));
} catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
    Log.d(TAG, "exception" );
    e.printStackTrace();
}

        // appendToEmulator(bytes, 0, bytes.length);

 return;
}

This is what I call to send data. sendData(Byte[] data) is a library method.

public static void sendOverSerial(byte[] data) {
        String str;
        try {
            str = new String(data,"UTF-8");
             if(mSelectedAdapter !=null && data !=null){
                 Log.d(TAG, "send over serial string==== " + str);

                mSelectedAdapter.sendData(str.getBytes("UTF-8"));
                 }
        } catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
            Log.d(TAG, "exception");
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }

Once data is sent the reply is received here:

public void onDataReceived(int id, byte[] data) {

        try {
            dataReceived = new String(data, "UTF-8");
        } catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
            Log.d(TAG, "exception");
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        try {
            dataReceivedByte = dataReceived.getBytes("UTF-8");
        } catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
            Log.d(TAG, "exception");
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        statusBool = true;
        Log.d(TAG, "in data received " + dataReceived);
        ((MyBAIsWrapper) bis).renew(data);


        runOnUiThread(new Runnable(){

            @Override
            public void run() {

                mSession.appendToEmulator(dataReceivedByte, 0, dataReceivedByte.length);

            }});

    viewHandler.post(updateView);

}

Relevant section of library class where characters are written:

Relevant section of class:

private void sendText(CharSequence text) {
                int n = text.length();
                char c;
                try {
                    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
                        c = text.charAt(i);
                        if (Character.isHighSurrogate(c)) {
                            int codePoint;
                            if (++i < n) {
                                codePoint = Character.toCodePoint(c, text.charAt(i));
                            } else {
                                // Unicode Replacement Glyph, aka white question mark in black diamond.
                                codePoint = '\ufffd';
                            }
                            mapAndSend(codePoint);
                        } else {
                            mapAndSend(c);
                        }
                    }
                } catch (IOException e) {
                    Log.e(TAG, "error writing ", e);
                }
            }

            private void mapAndSend(int c) throws IOException {
                int result = mKeyListener.mapControlChar(c);
                if (result < TermKeyListener.KEYCODE_OFFSET) {
                    mTermSession.write(result);
                } else {
                    mKeyListener.handleKeyCode(result - TermKeyListener.KEYCODE_OFFSET, getKeypadApplicationMode());
                }
                clearSpecialKeyStatus();
            }
share|improve this question
    
Just out of curiosity do you get 4 shevrons if you enter the word hello – David Hirst Jan 25 '13 at 16:45
    
after I type every character I get ~0~0~0 so hello is: h~0~0~0e~0~0~0l~0~0~0l~0~0~0o~0~0~0 – Paul Jan 25 '13 at 16:49
    
I could be clutching at straws but the reason I ask is because looking at your sendText method I am just trying to think if it could be a simple coding error considering you say you have used other encodings. What happens if you remove the If statement within your loop and just pass c to mapAndSend? – David Hirst Jan 25 '13 at 16:53
    
I will try that, that code is from the library so I haven't touched it. thanks! – Paul Jan 25 '13 at 16:59
1  
@Paul to print out the bytes you need to do something like this: String log = ""; for( byte i : byteArray ) { log += String.format("0x%02X, ", i); } Log.d(TAG, log); – Esailija Jan 30 '13 at 14:31

Java stores text internally as unencoded Unicode. Used to be 16 bits, now I'm guessing it's 32 based on the fact that you're getting four characters of output on your terminal for every unicode character you're trying to output.

What you probably want to do is use something like string.getBytes("ASCII") to convert your unicode string into straight single-byte ascii. If your terminal emulator handles other character sets (like Latin-1), use that instead of "ASCII".

Then, transmit the bytes to your terminal emulator instead of the string.

Notes: I'm not positive that "ASCII" is the exact name of the character set; you'll want to research that yourself. Also, I don't know what getBytes() will do with unicode characters that can't be translated to ascii, so you'll want to research that too.

ETA: I'm having trouble following your code logic from the scraps you posted. Who calls write(), where did the data come from, and where does it go? Same questions applies to sendOverSerial() and onDataReceived().

In any event, I'm almost dead certain that somewhere, raw 32-bit Unicode data was converted to bytes without being encoded. From that point forward, either sending it as-is or re-encoding it as UTF-8 would produce the effect you're seeing. I don't see how this could have happened in any of the code you posted, so I'm guessing it happened elsewhere before any of the functions you showed us are being called.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I've tried adding ascii and other charsets everywhere I said UTF-8 above but I get the same result. Alwyas one correct byte and 3 others. I'll try latin one. – Paul Jan 25 '13 at 16:33
    
Write is called when i press a key, library set it up like this somewhere. � is mentioned in this class: github.com/jackpal/Android-Terminal-Emulator/wiki/… which is what I am looking through for an answer, I think it is the class responsible for the 32 bit unicode. When I send something to write, all write does is call sendOverSerial, this sends data over serial as bytes and I can see from the log that it already is 32 bits. – Paul Jan 28 '13 at 9:58
    
Then the answering echo comes back into onDataReceived and the data is written to the screen. If I write the data to the screen before sending it over serial the correct character is written, because � is ignored, but because I am sending data over serial the serial console seems to be able to recognize the � as ~0 and presumably null is returned as ~0 which can be written to the screen whereas � was not. – Paul Jan 28 '13 at 9:59
    
edited in relevant section of library class, this is where characters are sent to write. – Paul Jan 28 '13 at 11:19
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have solved this issue by editing the library I am using. They were using a method which converted a byte to an int, it accepted a codePoint and converted it. So for every key press 4 bytes are used. I changed this so that a byte is used instead of an int. No more extra bytes. Nothing got to do with the encoding format.

share|improve this answer

It appears that the library you are using is sending code points as int's (which are 32bit) and your code is assuming its encoded as utf-8 which doesn't handle the 4-bytes properly. This is not related to how java stores text internally. Btw Java stores text internally as encoded UTF-16, not unencoded unicode. Again, this isn't the cause of this issue. It is how you are interacting with the library you are using.

share|improve this answer

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