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I was testing rotation on div. I noticed that when i rotate div with CSS, it produces aliasing which looks awkward. Here is the Fiddle:

Fiddle

CSS:

.alaised {
    width:200px;
    height:200px;
    border:2px solid green;
    transform:rotate(-8deg);
    -webkit-transform:rotate(-8deg);
    -moz-transform:rotate(-8deg);
    margin:50px;
}

In the fiddle, when div is rotated it is aliased and on hover when not rotated, anti-aliased.

How can I remove this behaviour? I tried searching on web and tried by adding shadows of small width with same color but shadow of it is also aliased.

Note: This Behaviour is not detected on higher resolution screens. But on 1024x768 and less which are the most common resolutions these days suffer from this.

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1 Answer 1

just found an approach: http://jsfiddle.net/zGAvZ/1/ (tried on fx 18)

relevant CSS

.aliased {
    width:200px;
    height:200px;
    margin:50px;
}

.aliased:after {
    content: "";
    display: block;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    border:2px solid green;
    transform:rotate(-8deg);
    -webkit-transform:rotate(-8deg);
    -moz-transform:rotate(-8deg);
}

.aliased:hover {
    transform:rotate(8deg);
    -webkit-transform:rotate(8deg);
    -moz-transform:rotate(8deg);    
}

The idea is to rotate the :after pseudoelement on normal state and make an opposite rotation on the element itself on hover. On Firefox 18 the square looks nice even after the hover state

share|improve this answer
    
same result buddy :D –  Muhammad Talha Akbar Jan 25 '13 at 16:14
    
no, I see a different result: in your example I clearly see serrated edges after the hover for just a while, and in my example the edges are always smooth –  Fabrizio Calderan Jan 25 '13 at 16:16
    
what about chrome, opera, safari and IE? Wait a min, i check it on FF18. And What is the Resolution of your screen? –  Muhammad Talha Akbar Jan 25 '13 at 16:18
    
In chrome the effect is nice. Opera and IE are not supported in your example, so I didn't tried. Why the resolution should matter? :| –  Fabrizio Calderan Jan 25 '13 at 16:22
    
@FabrizioCaldren when website is on higher resolution, the pixels supporting the area are abundant and sharped by VGA cards. But on the Resolution like 1024x768, it is visible clearly. I tested on 1366x768 and 1024x768. On 1366x768, there was no alaising. But 1024x768 has. –  Muhammad Talha Akbar Jan 25 '13 at 16:25

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