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I wonder if anyone out there can assist me in trying to solve a issue with me.

I have written a set of shell scripts with the purpose of auditing remote file systems based on a GOLD build on a audit server.

As part of this, I do the following:

1) Use rsync to work out any new files or directories, any modified or removed files

2) Use find ${source_filesystem} -ls on both local & remote to work out permissions differences

Now as part of this there are certain files or directories that I am excluding, i.e. logs, trace files etc.

So in order to achieve this I use 2 methods:

1) RSYNC - I have an exclude-list that is added using --exclude-from flag

2) find -ls - I use a egrep -v statement to exclude the same as the rsync exclude-list:

e.g. find -L ${source_filesystem} -ls | egrep -v "$SEXCLUDE_supt"

So my issue is that I have to maintain 2 separate lists and this is a bit of a admin nightmare.

I am looking for some assistance or some advice on if it is possible to dynamically build a list of exlusions that can be used for both the rsync or the find -ls?

Here is the format of what the exclude lists look like::

RSYNC:

*.log
*.out
*.csv
logs
shared
tracing
jdk*
8.6_Code
rpsupport
dbarchive
inarchive
comms
PR116PICL
**/lost+found*/
dlxwhsr*
regression
tmp
working
investigation
Investigation
dcsserver_weblogic_*.ear
dcswebrdtEAR_weblogic_*.ear

FIND:

SEXCLUDE_supt="\.log|\.out|\.csv|logs|shared|PR116PICL|tracing|lost\+found|jdk|8\.6\_Code|rpsupport|dbarchive|inarchive|comms|dlxwhsr|regression|tmp|working|investigation|Investigation|dcsserver_weblogic_|dcswebrdtEAR_weblogic_"
share|improve this question

You don't need to create a second list for your find command. grep can handle a list of patterns using the -f flag. From the manual:

-f FILE, --file=FILE
    Obtain patterns from FILE, one per line. The empty file contains zero 
    patterns, and therefore matches nothing. (-f is specified by POSIX.)

Here's what I'd do:

find -L ${source_filesystem} -ls | grep -Evf your_rsync_exclude_file_here

This should also work for filenames containing newlines and spaces. Please let me know how it goes.

share|improve this answer
    
many thanks for the help here, do you happen to know if RSYNC / GREP both support regex? – Cambolie Jan 28 '13 at 11:01
    
I think you're getting wildcards and regex confused. See here. This is why you'll find using the same list for two different tools rather difficult. – Steve Jan 29 '13 at 6:31

In the end the grep -Evf was a bit of a nightmare as rsync didnt support regex, it uses regex but not the same.

So I then pursued my other idea of dynamically building the exclude list for egrep by parsing the rsync exclude-list and building variable on the fly to pass into egrep.

This the method I used:

#!/bin/ksh
# Create Signature of current build

AFS=$1

#Create Signature File
crSig()
{
  find -L ${SRC} -ls | egrep -v **"$SEXCLUDE"** | awk '{fws = ""; for (i = 11; i <= NF; i++) fws = fws $i " "; print $3, $6, fws}' | sort >${BASE}/${SIFI}.${AFS}
}

#Setup SRC, TRG & SCROOT
LoadAuditReqs()
{
  export SRC=`grep ${AFS} ${CONF}/fileSystem.properties | awk {'print $2'}`
  export TRG=`grep ${AFS} ${CONF}/fileSystem.properties | awk {'print $3'}`
  export SCROOT=`grep ${AFS} ${CONF}/fileSystem.properties | awk {'print $4'}`
  **export BEXCLUDE=$(sed -e 's/[*/]//g' -e 's/\([._+-]\)/\\\1/g' ${CONF}/exclude-list.${AFS} | tr "\n" "|")**
  **export SEXCLUDE=$(echo ${BEXCLUDE} |  sed 's/\(.*\)|/\1/')**
}

#Load Properties File
LoadProperties()
{
  . /users/rpapp/rpmonit/audit_tool/conf/environment.properties
}

#Functions
LoadProperties
LoadAuditReqs
crSig

So with these new variables:

  **export BEXCLUDE=$(sed -e 's/[*/]//g' -e 's/\([._+-]\)/\\\1/g' ${CONF}/exclude-list.${AFS} | tr "\n" "|")**
  **export SEXCLUDE=$(echo ${BEXCLUDE} |  sed 's/\(.*\)|/\1/')**

I use them to remove "*" and "/", then match my special characters and prepend with "\" to escape them.

Then it using "tr" replace a newline with "|" and then rerunning that output to remove the trailing "|" to make the variable $SEXCLUDE to use for egrep that is used in the crSig function.

What do you think?

share|improve this answer
    
for some reason it has added some ** in my text around the variables, please ignore these. – Cambolie Jan 31 '13 at 11:51

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