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Rebol's INTO allows the parser to descend into a series type (e.g. BLOCK! or PAREN!) to apply a match rule to the contents of the block. Here's a simple example in Rebol 3:

data: [(a b)]

parse data [into [pos: 'a 'b (
    probe pos
    either pos = (first data) [
        print rejoin ["equal to original " mold first data]
    ] [
        print rejoin ["not equal to original " mold first data]
    ]
)]]

As the only thing in the block is a parenthesized series, the INTO rule is matched right away. Using a SET-WORD!, the parser is told to capture the position upon entry to the parentheses in pos. A and B are matched as literal LIT-WORD!s, and then the ensuing code is executed. The expected result happens:

(a b)
equal to original (a b)

That's great. But weirdly, Rebol 2 transforms parens into blocks for the same code:

[a b]
not equal to original (a b)

The same block conversion happens if your input is data: [a/b]:

[a b]
not equal to original a/b

Why does this happen? Is there a way to get the Rebol 3 behavior if you're using Rebol 2?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a property Carl found "weird" in R2. Therefore, he replaced it in R3 by a more expectable behaviour. Curiously, the block you obtain that way is identical with the paren! (just try to change the contents), but declares it has a different type. However, if you need to refer to the paren in R2, your code can be easily adjusted:

data: [(a b)]

parse data [pos: into ['a 'b (
    pos: first pos
    probe pos
    either pos = (first data) [
        print rejoin ["equal to original " mold first data]
    ] [
        print rejoin ["not equal to original " mold first data]
    ]
)]]

another modification that gives you the desired result:

data: [(a b)]
parse data [set pos into ['a 'b] (
    probe pos
    either pos = (first data) [
        print rejoin ["equal to original " mold first data]
    ] [
        print rejoin ["not equal to original " mold first data]
    ]
)]
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, interesting - I had not tested to see that they were actually "aliased" instances of the same information, but did not compare as equal. (I've only seen that happen one other place with AS-BINARY and AS-STRING in R2.) –  HostileFork Jan 25 '13 at 21:50
    
Yes, as-binary, as-string and disarm exhibit this behaviour as well. –  Ladislav Jan 27 '13 at 13:34

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