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I come from an Objective-C background, and I'm writing some VB.NET that includes a delegate. I have a class Worker that performs some task. One of the properties of this class is an ILogger object, which has a method for appending to some log file. (I want my Worker object to be decoupled from the logging, which will be handled by my GUI.) In Objective-C I could just declare

@property (nonatomic, strong) id<LoggingDelegate> logger;

and then sprinkle my code with lines like

[logger appendToLog:@"Beginning polarity reversal..."];

In Objective-C, logger doesn't actually need to be set to an object for this to work; if it's a null reference ("nil" in Objective-C), the appendToLog: message is silently ignored by the runtime.

In VB.NET I can do something similar:

Public Property logger As ILogger

and

logger.AppendText("Beginning polarity reversal...")

But of course, logger actually needs to be set to an object for this to work. What's the idiomatic way to handle the case that I don't have a logger object attached to my worker? (More generally, is my implementation of the delegate pattern idiomatic in VB.NET?)

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3  
One way to do is required that logger not be null, but if it isn't specified default it to a NullLogger that implements ILogger where the logging methods do nothing. –  vcsjones Jan 25 '13 at 16:34
    

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Every time you use the optional object, you could check if it's null first, for instance:

If logger IsNot Nothing Then
    logger.AppendText("Beginning polarity reversal...")
End If

Or, you could create a private method that does the extra check for you:

Private Sub AppendTextToLog(text As String)
    If logger IsNot Nothing Then
        logger.AppendText("Beginning polarity reversal...")
    End If
End Sub

Or, as vcsjones recommended, you could default the property to a dummy object:

Public Class MyClass
    Private Class DummyLogger
        Implements ILogger

        Public Sub AppendText(text As String) Implements ILogger.AppendText
            ' Do nothing
        End Sub
    End Class

    Public Property Logger As ILogger
        Get
            Return _logger
        End Get
        Set(ByVal value As ILogger)
            _logger = value
        End Set
    End Property
    Private _logger As ILogger = New DummyLogger()

    Public Sub DoWork()
        _logger.AppendText("Beginning polarity reversal...")
    End Sub
End Class

Or, the closest thing to an "optional delegate" in VB.NET is actually an Event:

Public Class MyClass
    Public Event AppendText(text As String)

    Public Sub DoWork()
        RaiseEvent AppendText("Beginning polarity reversal...")
    End Sub
End Class
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+1 for Event, but note that Event is basically a wrapper around delegate. Both are multicast and "optional". Event is to delegate what property is to field. A property has get/set methods that lets you control how a backing field gets set (in the usual case). An event has add/remove (by default you don't customize these) which lets you control how a backing delegate gets set. –  Nelson Rothermel Jan 25 '13 at 17:38
    
I was trying to avoid that first approach, but DummyLogger seems reasonably clean. –  bdesham Feb 4 '13 at 22:09

I am suspending my moral convictions for a moment to point out that extension methods can be called on null objects. So if you write:

Module M
    <Extension>
    Public Sub LogIfNotNull(logger As ILogger, message As String)
        If logger IsNot Nothing Then
            logger.AppendText(message)
        End If
   End Sub
End Module

You can use this extension method to write to your ILogger and it'll do what you want. Now, I do not recommend placing your address near this piece of code, because the next developer who finds it probably will want to know where you live. Enough said.

vcsjones' point is the best (who should really write that as an answer so you can accept it!): make a NullLogger object and use that. Then the abstraction of "I don't want to log" is hidden from the caller.

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