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I'm using git svn, and needed to merge an svn-backed project branch from trunk. Attempts to use native svn merge messed up, so trying to be careful I created two plain git branches, one from trunk, one from my project branch, and used git merge between these new branches.

I now want to examine the changes between the project and trunk branches, but only for the files added/removed/changed in the merge I created - there's been quite a lot of work on both branches, although little actual overlap.

I cooked the following up which works, but doesn't feel elegant:

$ git diff soa-2237-from soa-2237-to $( git show HEAD |
       grep -E '^[-+]{3}' |
       cut -c7- |
       sort -u)

Given that I've already done the hacky merge, is there a more elegant expression of this diff?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, instead of using git show HEAD | <hacky grep/cut/sort stuff> to get your list of files, you could use git diff --name-only HEAD~1, which is a bit less ugly, and lists the file names that had changes in the between the current HEAD and it's first parent.

You also should probably separate file names from the rest of the command, like so:

git diff branch1 branch2 -- $( git diff --name-only HEAD~1 )

That'll help if you ever run into files that have names starting with -.

Note, you could also do this referencing a third branch that is not the one you're on:

git diff branch1 branch2 -- $( git diff --name-only branch3~1 branch3 )

In that case you have to name the two commits to compare to get your file list, since the default HEAD argument won't be applicable.

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Thanks, that's much prettier. I must have read the diff man page in the past, but the grep/cut stuff flows naturally to my fingers. –  android.weasel Jan 28 '13 at 13:22

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