Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
class StationSongs {
protected:
    int original_song; 
};

class NewsRadio: public StationSongs {
public:
    NewsRadio()
    {
        current_song = NULL;
        currently_empty = 0;
        original_song = 0;
        start_time_of_song = 0;
        next_song_to_play = NULL;
    }
};

class CommercialRadio : public StationSongs {
public:
    CommercialRadio() {
        current_song = NULL;
        currently_empty = 0;
        original_song = 0;
        start_time_of_song = 0;
        next_song_to_play = NULL;
    }
};

The problem : I want to use inherited classes as map Value

The map is:

typedef MtmMap<double, StationSongs*> RadioMap;


method{

    CommercialRadio new_station();

    RadioPair new_pair(stationFrequency,*new_station);

    radio.insert(new_pair);
}

I get This error :

Multiple markers at this line

- no matching function for call to 'mtm::MtmMap<double, mtm::StationSongs*>::Pair::Pair(double&, 

mtm::CommercialRadio 
     (&)())'

How can i Solve this ???

share|improve this question
    
This really depends on the definition of MtmMap and type of new_pair(); these aren't standard classes and apparently come from a library you use (or your own code). Can you post them? – Angew Jan 25 '13 at 17:47
1  
Can you remove the slew of extra asterisks please and all that? Those are significant operators in C++ and it could be that your problem is caused by that. Further, concerning the topic of your question, you can not use polymorphic types in any standard containers. Never. Really. The only thing you can do is to use pointers, which you got completely right. Now, even with the reduced readability, CommercialRadio new_station(); is a function declaration, search for "C++ most vexing parse". – Ulrich Eckhardt Jan 25 '13 at 19:42

CommercialRadio new_station(); declares a function new_station that takes no arguments and returns a CommercialRadio. Remove the parentheses. This property of the C++ language is known as the most vexing parse.

Furthermore, it’s almost certainly incorrect that your base class doesn’t define a virtual destructor.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.