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Doing something like this:

using (XmlWriter myMamlHelpWriter = XmlWriter.Create(myFileStream, XmlHelpExToMamlXslTransform.OutputSettings))
{
    XmlHelpExToMamlXslTransform.Transform(myMsHelpExTopicFilePath, null, myMamlHelpWriter);
}

where

private static XslCompiledTransform XmlHelpExToMamlXslTransform
{
    get
    {
        if (fMsHelpExToMamlXslTransform == null)
        {
            // Create the XslCompiledTransform and load the stylesheet.
            fMsHelpExToMamlXslTransform = new XslCompiledTransform();
            using (Stream myStream = typeof(XmlHelpBuilder).Assembly.GetManifestResourceStream(
                typeof(XmlHelpBuilder),
                MamlXmlTopicConsts.cMsHelpExToMamlTransformationResourceName))
            {
                XmlTextReader myReader = new XmlTextReader(myStream);
                fMsHelpExToMamlXslTransform.Load(myReader, null, null);
            }
        }

        return fMsHelpExToMamlXslTransform;
    }
}

And every time the string """ is replaced with real quotes in the result file.
Cannot understand why this happens...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The reason is that in the XSLT's internal representation, " is exactly the same characer as ". They both represent the ascii code point 0x34. It would seem that when the XslCompiledTransform produces its output, it uses " where it's legal to do so. I would imagine that it would still output " inside an attribute value.

Is it a problem for you that " is produced as " in the output?

I just ran the following XSLT in Visual Studio using an arbitrary input file:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
  <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>

  <xsl:template match="/*">
    <xml>
      <xsl:variable name="chars">&quot;&apos;&lt;&gt;&amp;</xsl:variable>
      <node a='{$chars}' b="{$chars}">
        <xsl:value-of select="$chars"/>
      </node>
    </xml>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

The output was:

<xml>
  <node a="&quot;'&lt;&gt;&amp;" b="&quot;'&lt;&gt;&amp;">"'&lt;&gt;&amp;</node>
</xml>

As you can see, even though all five characters were represented as entities originally, the apostrophies are produced as ' everywhere, and quotation marks are produced as " in text nodes. Furthermore, the a attribute which had ' delimiters uses " delimiters in the output. As I said, as far as the XSLT cares, a quotation mark is just a quotation mark, and an attribute is just an attribute. How those are produced in the output is up to the XSLT processor.

Edit: The root cause of this behavior appears to be the behavior of the XmlWriter class. It looks like the general suggestion for those who want more customized escaping is to extend the XmlTextWriter class. This page has an implementation that looks fairly promising:

public class KeepEntityXmlTextWriter : XmlTextWriter
{
    private static readonly string[] ENTITY_SUBS = new string[] { "&apos;", "&quot;" };
    private static readonly char[] REPLACE_CHARS = new char[] { '\'', '"' };

    public KeepEntityXmlTextWriter(string filename) : base(filename, null) { ; }

    private void WriteStringWithReplace(string text)
    {
        string[] textSegments = text.Split(KeepEntityXmlTextWriter.REPLACE_CHARS);

        if (textSegments.Length > 1)
        {
            for (int pos = -1, i = 0; i < textSegments.Length; ++i)
            {
                base.WriteString(textSegments[i]);
                pos += textSegments[i].Length + 1;

                // Assertion: Replace the following if-else when the number of
                // replacement characters and substitute entities has grown
                // greater than 2.
                Debug.Assert(2 == KeepEntityXmlTextWriter.REPLACE_CHARS.Length);

                if (pos != text.Length)
                {
                    if (text[pos] == KeepEntityXmlTextWriter.REPLACE_CHARS[0])
                        base.WriteRaw(KeepEntityXmlTextWriter.ENTITY_SUBS[0]);
                    else
                        base.WriteRaw(KeepEntityXmlTextWriter.ENTITY_SUBS[1]);
                }
            }
        }
        else base.WriteString(text);
    }

    public override void WriteString( string text)
    {
        this.WriteStringWithReplace(text);
    }
}

On the other hand, the MSDN documentation recommends using XmlWriter.Create() rather than instantiating XmlTextWriters directly.

In the .NET Framework 2.0 release, the recommended practice is to create XmlWriter instances using the XmlWriter.Create method and the XmlWriterSettings class. This allows you to take full advantage of all the new features introduced in this release. For more information, see Creating XML Writers.

One way around that would be to use the same logic as above, but put it in a class that wraps an XmlWriter. This page has a ready-made implementation of an XmlWrappingWriter, that you can modify as needed.

To use the above code with the XmlWrappingWriter, you would subclass the wrapping writer, like this:

public class KeepEntityWrapper : XmlWrappingWriter
{
    public KeepEntityWrapper(XmlWriter baseWriter)
        : base(baseWriter)
    {
    }

    private static readonly string[] ENTITY_SUBS = new string[] { "&apos;", "&quot;" };
    private static readonly char[] REPLACE_CHARS = new char[] { '\'', '"' };

    private void WriteStringWithReplace(string text)
    {
        string[] textSegments = text.Split(REPLACE_CHARS);

        if (textSegments.Length > 1)
        {
            for (int pos = -1, i = 0; i < textSegments.Length; ++i)
            {
                base.WriteString(textSegments[i]);
                pos += textSegments[i].Length + 1;

                // Assertion: Replace the following if-else when the number of
                // replacement characters and substitute entities has grown
                // greater than 2.
                Debug.Assert(2 == REPLACE_CHARS.Length);

                if (pos != text.Length)
                {
                    if (text[pos] == REPLACE_CHARS[0])
                        base.WriteRaw(ENTITY_SUBS[0]);
                    else
                        base.WriteRaw(ENTITY_SUBS[1]);
                }
            }
        }
        else base.WriteString(text);
    }

    public override void WriteString(string text)
    {
        this.WriteStringWithReplace(text);
    }
}

Note this essentially the same code as the KeepEntityXmlTextWriter, but using XmlWrappingWriter as the base class and with a different constructor.

I don't recognize the Guard that the XmlWrappingWriter code is using in two places, but given that you'll be consuming the code yourself, it should be pretty safe to delete the lines like this. They just ensure that a null value isn't passed to the constructor or the (in the above case inaccessible) BaseWriter property:

Guard.ArgumentNotNull(baseWriter, "baseWriter");

To create an instance of the XmlWrappingWriter, you would create an XmlWriter however you need to, and then use:

KeepEntityWrapper wrap = new KeepEntityWrapper(writer);

And then you'd use this wrap variable as the XmlWriter you pass to your XSL transform.

share|improve this answer
    
in our documenter tool we produce HTML files for HxS compiler using an XSLT transformation. The HxS compiler generates some warnings/errors if it encounters quotes but not &quot; - so we need exactly the behavior I'm asking about. I thought there is a option to turn automatic conversion for quotes off so we could do the work in one step. –  TecMan Jan 28 '13 at 8:27
1  
It doesn't look like any such option is available, but I've done some researching and it looks like there are decent ways to accomplish this. Please have a look above. Of course the XSLT still has no idea whether the original character was " or &quot;, and with the above approach, all double quotes would be escaped as &quot;, but hopefully that's sufficient for what you need. –  JLRishe Jan 28 '13 at 9:25
    
THANKS A LOT for this useful tip! I guess we need to go this way. I'm already playing with it, and KeepEntityXmlTextWriter does the work. However, I have no cluse of how to combine it with XmlWrappingWriter properly. Can you show me some code? –  TecMan Jan 29 '13 at 7:43
    
And BTW, the first versions of our tool used XmlTextWriter like this: using (XmlTextWriter myMamlHelpWriter = new XmlTextWriter(myFileStream, Encoding.Unicode)) { XmlHelpExToMamlXslTransform.Transform(myMsHelpExTopicFilePath, null, myMamlHelpWriter); } But we abandoned this approach as we cannot specify the UTF-8 encoding, and the XML prolog gets lost in this case too. –  TecMan Jan 29 '13 at 7:45
    
Updated my suggestion above. –  JLRishe Jan 29 '13 at 8:19
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The XSLT processor doesn't know whether a character was represented by a character entity or not. This is because the XML parser substitutes any character entity with its code-value.

Therefore, the XSLT processor would see exactly the same character, regardless whether it was represented as " or as &quot; or as &#x22; or as &#34;.

What you want can be achieved in XSLT 2.0 by using the so called "character maps".

share|improve this answer
    
I have not managed to construct the corresponding XSLT file in my VS 2010. I know, VS 2010 does not support XSLT 2.0, so this is a question to you - is it possible to do that in VS at all? If so, then an you show me how it could look? And I also read about character maps and some other related sections. What about using disabling output escaping for our task? –  TecMan Jan 28 '13 at 8:46
1  
@TecMan, No, .NET doesn't have a native XSLT 2.0 processor. One may use 3rd party XSLT 2.0 processors, such as Saxon 9.x, XMLPrime or Altova. As for XSLT IDE that supports XSLT 2.0 (and even XSLT 3.0), one can use oXygen or Stylus Studio. I have been using the XSelerator for 12 years and it is my main XSLT IDE.As for DOE -- you could use it, if it does the job -- however be warned that your XSLT code automatically becomes non-portable, because DOE isn't a mandatory feature of XSLT and some XSLT processor don't support DOE. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 28 '13 at 13:06
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