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So I've been developing a JavaScript code library for my job that makes use of a few functions that simulate classical inheritance in JS. (See previous question: JavaScript Objects Sharing Local Variable).

It's been working great for a while, but now I'm running into a problem with the code that simulates super() functionality found in e.g. Java. Here's the code I'm using:

                /**
             * This function helps to simpulate classical inheritance in JavaScript.
             * 
             * It should be called at the end of the child class' constructor, to
             * then call the parent class' constructor
             */
            DataManipulatorControl.prototype.inheritsDM = function( parent ) {
                //:: Handle Arguments
                if( arguments.length > 1 ) {
                    if (parent.apply) {
                        parent.apply(this, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1));
                    }
                }

                //:: Handle No Arguments
                else {
                    parent.call(this);
                }
            }

            /**
             * This function helps to simpulate classical inheritance in JavaScript.
             * 
             * It should be called after the child class' constructor is defined,
             * to set up the prototype.
             */
            Function.prototype.inheritsDM  = function(parent) {
                this.prototype             = new parent();
                this.prototype.constructor = this;
            }

            /**
             * This function provides access to 'super' methods - functions
             * overridden in a subclass which exist in that class' prototype
             */
            Function.prototype.sup = function(search_element) {
                var proto = this.prototype;
                return supHelper(proto, search_element);
            }

            function supHelper(proto, search_element) {
                //:: Check If Exists In Current Prototype
                if (proto.hasOwnProperty(search_element)) {
                    return proto[search_element];
                }

                //:: Check If Parent Exists
                if (proto.parent === undefined) {
                    return null;
                }

                //:: Check If Exists In Parent
                return supHelper(proto.parent, search_element);
            }

Then here's an example of how it is used:

                function CompanyScreen() {
                this.inheritsDM(DataManipulatorWindowControl);
                var that = this;

                // ...subclass code...

            }
            CompanyScreen.inheritsDM(DataManipulatorWindowControl);

The problem I'm running into is with the 'that' variable. I assign 'this' to 'that' because in JS, "private" functions (i.e. functions that exist only as variables in the constructor, not as members of 'this') do not have access to 'this'. Therefore I need to define a pointer to 'this' in the constructor that is in the scope of the private function.

And that works fine whenever I call functions normally; ordinarily the object stored in 'that' is the instance of the subclass referred to by 'this'. However, when I call a "super" version of the function, 'that' points to the instance of the base class used as a prototype. e.g.:

                    /**
                 * (child class)
                 */
                this.processIntel = function(intel_packet) {
                    //:: Call Parent
                    CompanyScreen.sup('processIntel').call(this, intel_packet);

                    //:: Process Intel
                    this.redraw();
                }

                /**
                 * (parent class).
                 */
                this.processIntel = function(intel_packet) {
                    //:: Call Parent
                    DataManipulatorWindowControl.sup('processIntel').call(this, intel_packet);

                    //:: Process Intel
                    that.enabled        (intel_packet.enabled,           true);
                    that.titleBarVisible(intel_packet.title_bar_visible, true);
                    that.x              (intel_packet.x,                 true);
                    that.y              (intel_packet.y,                 true);
                    that.width          (intel_packet.width,             true);
                    that.height         (intel_packet.height,            true);
                    that.defaultPadding (intel_packet.default_padding,   true);
                    that.inline         (intel_packet.inline,            true);
                }

When called via the sup() function, 'that' in the base class does not refer to 'that' in the child class; the code executes without an error, but the information is stored in an instance of the base class.

And that makes sense, given what I know about closures, and the implementation of inheritance I'm using. Now, I can easily work around that by using 'this' for all public functions (those attached as members to 'this'), so that if they're called via super(), this problem can be avoided altogether.

However I'm concerned that if a function in a parent class relies on a private function from that class - one that uses 'that', that it can produce difficult to debug code (I've already spent over a day tracking this issue down). This will become more of a problem if/when other developers in my company begin to contribute to this code base.

So, does anyone know of a way that I can elegantly solve this issue? I was googling around a bit, looking for a way to perhaps change the variable environment/scope of a function (i.e. change the variable scope of the parent function from its instance to that of the child class), but I couldn't find anything.

Thanks for any input, ~ Nate

share|improve this question
    
Why not use an existing Class-ish library or embrace JavaScript's non-classical inheritance model? – Jim Deville Jan 25 '13 at 18:37
    
Could you try to break your code down to a minimum, good readable example? That one could try out? That would help analyzing your problem. I have a complete other solution for the "super" problem. – Chris Jan 25 '13 at 18:40
    
have you considered not going through contortions to fake "private" methods? just make normal methods with underscored names and get on with your life – Eevee Jan 25 '13 at 18:55
    
I think that you're thinking about JS inheritance entirely wrong. There are no "private" methods/properties in ECMAScript... simply anonymous closures (which are extremely expensive on several levels [just mentioning that as an aside]). My recommendation is for you to simply stop using them as they--most likely--serve no purpose and you're just using "private" scope stuff due to your personal knowledge-based convention (as in, "make it like Java because that's what I know"). – mr.stobbe Oct 29 '14 at 3:32

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