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I have:

int8_t byteFlag;

and I want to get the first bit of it? I think I probably need to use & and >> but not sure how exactly. Any help?

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By first bit, do you mean Most Significant or Least Significant ? –  AsheeshR Jan 25 '13 at 18:40
    
I mean Most Significant. –  Helen Jan 25 '13 at 18:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
int func(int8_t byteFlag, int whichBit)
{
    if (whichBit > 0 && whichBit <= 8)
        return (byteFlag & (1<<(whichBit-1)));
    else
        return 0;
}

Now func(byteFlag, 1) will return 1'st bit from LSB. You can pass 8 as whichBit to get 8th bit (MSB).

<< is a left shift operant. It will shift the value 1 to the appropriate place and then we have to do & operation to get value of that particual bit in byteFlag.

for func(75, 4)

75         -> 0100 1011
1          -> 0000 0001
1 << (4-1) -> 0000 1000 //means 3 times shifting left

75 & (1 << (4 - 1)) will give us 1.

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Thanks! I couldn't upvote for now :( Could you please give more explanation about 1 << (whichBit-1) do? for example, if whichBit is 3, what does 1 << 2 do? I understand that << is shift left –  Helen Jan 25 '13 at 18:55
    
updated my answer –  raja ashok Jan 25 '13 at 19:00
    
Thanks a lot raja! Very helpful : ) –  Helen Jan 25 '13 at 19:06
    
Go through en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mask_%28computing%29 for bitmasking. –  raja ashok Jan 25 '13 at 19:07
    
Does the output of this depend on processor endianness, or is it always big endian? –  9000 Aug 13 at 6:55

Just mask the high bit

int8_t high_bit = byteFlag & (1 << 7); //either 1 or 0

Another trick since this is a signed int

if (byteFlag < 0) firstBitSet = true;

The last one works because of the representation of numbers in two's complement. The high bit is set if the number is negative.

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You would use the & operator.

If by "first bit" you mean LSB:

int firstBit = byteFlag & 1;

If by "first bit" you mean MSB:

int firstBit = byteFlag >> (sizeof(byteFlag) * 8 - 1);
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1  
Technically it's the last bit you're getting :P –  Jesus Ramos Jan 25 '13 at 18:39
    
int8_t is guaranteed to be 1 byte in size. –  Jesus Ramos Jan 25 '13 at 18:40
    
@Jesus: no, there are different conventions on the numbering of bits. –  Paul R Jan 25 '13 at 18:40
    
@PaulR I should say at least 1 byte in size. –  Jesus Ramos Jan 25 '13 at 18:41
    
Thanks! What if I want to get the 3-th bit? I don't know how to use shift –  Helen Jan 25 '13 at 18:42
int8_t bit_value = (byteFlag & (1U << bitPosition)) ? 1 : 0 ;
/* now it's up to you to decide which bit is the "first".
   bitPosition = 0 is the minor bit. */
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The correct solution is given below. To get first bit of number, set bit = 1;

int bitvalue(int8_t num, int bit)
{
    if (bit > 0 && bit <= 8)
        return ( (num >> (bit-1)) & 1 );
    else
        return 0;
}
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