Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a striped black diamond using the class diamond (see fiddle here):

.diamond {
    border: 8px solid black;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
    margin: 0 auto;
    padding: 12%;
    width: 0;
    -webkit-transform: scaleY(0.5) rotate(45deg);
}
.diamond:before {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    right: -37.5%;
    bottom: 0;
    left: -37.5%;
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(black 50%, transparent 50%);
    -webkit-transform: scaleY(1.155) skewX(-30deg) rotate(30deg);
    background-size: 10px;
    content: '';
}

Now I want a class red that will make the diamond red, both the border and the stripes. I have managed to impose a red border, but not the red stripes. How can I modify the CSS for .red such that the stripes become red?

share|improve this question
    
FWIW I don't see stripes in either fiddle posted to date in FF. Just black and a red squares. –  isherwood Jan 25 '13 at 18:54
    
My code is WebKit only for now. Sorry. –  Randomblue Jan 25 '13 at 18:55
    
Gah. I should've seen that. Thanks. –  isherwood Jan 25 '13 at 18:55
1  
"Works only in WebKit" is the new "Works only in IE6" glazman.org/weblog/dotclear/index.php?post/2012/02/09/… ... please, please, start with the standards and add vendor prefixes only when necessary. –  Stephen P Jan 25 '13 at 19:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
.diamond {
    border: 8px solid black;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
    margin: 0 auto;
    padding: 12%;
    width: 0;
    -webkit-transform: scaleY(0.5) rotate(45deg);
}
.diamond:before {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    right: -37.5%;
    bottom: 0;
    left: -37.5%;
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(black 50%, transparent 50%);
    -webkit-transform: scaleY(1.155) skewX(-30deg) rotate(30deg);
    background-size: 10px;
    content: '';
}
.red {
    border-color: crimson !important;
}
.red:before {
    background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(red 50%, transparent 50%);
}

Fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/UQQMz/1/

share|improve this answer
    
Hold on. Why did you use background-image? An explanation would be nice. –  Randomblue Jan 25 '13 at 18:55
1  
Because if you use just background it will overwrite background-size: 10px. –  dfsq Jan 25 '13 at 18:57

Your problem is the order of precedence. The red class is handled before the diamond class because it appears in the CSS first. Move the red classes below the diamond class to fix your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Not convinced... –  Randomblue Jan 25 '13 at 18:56
    
Try it and see - with the red classes above, the stripes remain black, but with the red classes below, the red:before class comes into play. –  Gareth Cornish Jan 25 '13 at 18:59
    
Please provide a fiddle. Doesn't work for me. –  Randomblue Jan 25 '13 at 19:01
    
jsfiddle.net/UQQMz/3 –  Gareth Cornish Jan 25 '13 at 19:04
    
Ok. The extra line background-size: 10px; does it... –  Randomblue Jan 25 '13 at 19:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.