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What is the best way to move columns when the size is small?

Here is the example:

 <div class="row">
    <div class="two columns">...</div>
    <div class="seven columns">...</div>
    <div class="three columns">...</div>
</div>

I want the two column to move below the seven columns when the screen size is small. The only way I figured out to do it is to do something like:

 <div class="row">
    <div class="two columns hide-for-small">...</div>
    <div class="seven columns">...</div>
    <div class="two columns show-for-small">...</div>
    <div class="three columns">...</div>
</div>

But it seems kind of messy and can be confusing. Is there a better way?

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2 Answers 2

Foundation has a few classes that let you play with the column order. Check out the Source Ordering section in the Foundation Documentation.

For example:

<div class="row">
    <div class="seven columns push-two">...</div>
    <div class="two columns pull-seven">...</div>
    <div class="three columns">...</div>
</div>

On a larger screen the columns will be shown 2-7-3, but on smaller screens it will revert back to 7-2-3.

It's still a little messy and confusing, but better than having to create separate, duplicate columns for different displays.

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1  
Here is a similar question with a detailed example you can get from GitHub. stackoverflow.com/questions/13640954/… –  Ed Charbeneau Jan 27 '13 at 17:36

The way to get columns to drop below each other is by floating them and then letting the natural flow of CSS push them down as their parent container gets too narrow. Your CSS isn't in your question, so it's hard to know what the classes are doing.

I see a lot of questions on Stack Overflow about the frameworks that are popular and I think sometimes they just add to the confusion of how CSS naturally works.

Sorry for the non-answer, but I honestly think you would better served if you checked this out: http://codepen.io/bradfrost/full/zhCwd

My best advice would be to stay away from the frameworks if you can. They add a lot of (confusing) code you simply just don't need. Good luck, Keith.

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I totally understand what you mean but the frameworks makes things a lot easier. I will look into not using a framework though. –  Keith Jan 25 '13 at 20:05
    
This is not really an answer, as you stated. There are pros and cons to using frameworks, and this answer makes it seem that using frameworks, for any purpose, is ill-advised. –  ariestav Mar 7 at 17:53

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