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I'm trying to do something that seems so simple. I have a User class, and I have a Game class that matches up two Users. It's this simple:

class User {
    String username
    static hasMany = [games:Game]
}

class Game {
    User player1
    User player2
}

When I ran this, I got

Caused by GrailsDomainException: Property [games] in class [class User] is a bidirectional one-to-many with two possible properties on the inverse side. Either name one of the properties on other side of the relationship [user] or use the 'mappedBy' static to define the property that the relationship is mapped with. Example: static mappedBy = [games:'myprop']

So I did some digging and found mappedBy and changed my code to:

class User {
    String username
    static hasMany = [games:Game]
    static mappedBy = [games:'gid']
}

class Game {
    User player1
    User player2
    static mapping = {
        id generator:'identity', name:'gid'
    }
}

Now I get

Non-existent mapping property [gid] specified for property [games] in class [class User]

What am I doing wrong?

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I'd forgo what you started with and define the relationship as a simple many-to-many and control the biz logic of only 2 players per game elsewhere. –  Gregg Jan 25 '13 at 20:12
    
So you're saying keep the domain relatively simplistic by just saying that a Game hasMany Users, and then make sure it's exactly two different Users within the controller? –  Lee Grey Jan 25 '13 at 20:40
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

So here is probably what you want:

class User {

    static mappedBy = [player1Games: 'player1', player2Games: 'player2']

    static hasMany = [player1Games: Game, player2Games: Game]

    static belongsTo = Game
}

class Game {
    User player1
    User player2
}

Edit for new rules:

class User {
    static hasMany = [ games: Game ]
    static belongsTo = Game
}

class Game {
    static hasMany = [ players: User ]
    static constraints = {
        players(maxSize: 2)
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
To note, the only reason to do this is if you need/want to get games from a user object. –  James Kleeh Jan 25 '13 at 20:57
    
This works, thanks. But there's one thing that still doesn't fit my scenario. I created the player1 and player2 variables because I couldn't see a way around it. (Apologies for that being misleading in my OP.) I don't really want to have to distinguish between them. There is no real distinction between the two players in a Game. Is it possible for Game to have an array (size 2 would be ideal) of Users? And for User to have many Games, rather than player1Games and player2Games? I want to find all Games that a User is part of, and player1 or player2 is of no significance. –  Lee Grey Jan 25 '13 at 21:27
    
Yes, see updates –  James Kleeh Jan 25 '13 at 21:38
    
That's perfect. Having said that, is there an easy fix to make scaffolding work here? –  Lee Grey Jan 25 '13 at 23:49
    
Not that I know of. –  James Kleeh Jan 26 '13 at 1:58
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