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I have a function that generates insert statements for about 50 different tables and returns all of the insert statements in a variable, @sqlStatement. I am encountering a problem with orphaned rows when executing @sqlStatement. I know that the DB should enforce referential integrity, but the schema lacks most of the foreign constraints that are assumed by its architecture, allowing users to make updates that are otherwise prohibited (such as deleting rows from a parent table while there are child records referencing it). I'm not allowed to change anything about the DB schema. Rather, my question is on performance.

Currently, @sqlStatement is built like this:

SET @sqlStatement = CASE @p_TableName
WHEN 'TableName1' THEN
'
INSERT INTO ...
SELECT DISTINCT ...
FROM ...
' +

CASE WHEN @p_GenerateTableJoins = 1 THEN
'
INNER JOIN ...
INNER JOIN ...
INNER JOIN ...
'
ELSE ' ' END + 

'
WHERE ...
'

WHEN 'TableName2' THEN
'
INSERT INTO ...
SELECT DISTINCT ...
FROM ...
' +

CASE WHEN @p_GenerateTableJoins = 1 THEN
'
INNER JOIN ...
INNER JOIN ...
INNER JOIN ...
'
ELSE ' ' END + 

'
WHERE ... 
'

and so on.

The orphaned rows show up when @p_GenerateTableJoins = 0, so the INSERT statements don't have any of the INNER JOINS. When @p_GenerateTableJoins = 1, the INNER JOINS are all there and I don't end up with any orphaned rows.

So, my question is this: how big of a performance impact will it have if I include all of the INNER JOINS for this function?

share|improve this question
2  
Can you cite the source who told you to not trust the execution plan? I mean, if you read it on the Internet we should see the link. If it was "some DBA in the past" then you can say that too but it really smacks of FUD or misunderstanding –  swasheck Jan 25 '13 at 20:13
2  
@WillWeld in this case I think you've misunderstood the context of both the question and the answer. The OP in that question is running both queries simultaneously and the %s are relative to the batch ... and the second query is terrible. The execution plan provides you with what the engine is doing and you can look at it and evaluate opportunities for improvement. SET STATISTICS IO ON will give you some metrics on how SQL Server is getting the data, but you need to know how to interpret those too - just like the execution plan. –  swasheck Jan 25 '13 at 20:22
1  
A perfect example of "it depends on the situation" and "context is everything" regarding the other stackoverflow thread. Combine the statistics with the plan and you'll have some information to review. –  Kprof Jan 25 '13 at 20:34
2  
@WillWeld Plan Explorer (sorry, it took a minute for me to understand that, as I've never seen it referenced using an acronym) runs the query when you generate an actual plan, but discards the results (it is not a query tool). If you have an INSERT INTO, an actual plan generation will perform the insert. As Rachel said, why do you need the insert as part of the plan analysis? That part is going to be pretty predictable - clustered index insert (+ maybe some NC index updates). Also you can get an estimated plan from Plan Explorer, which won't run the query, but it will be much less useful. –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 25 '13 at 20:57
2  
In other words, stop focusing on the insert - there isn't much you're going to be able to do to speed that up (except not insert, or completely change the schema). Focus on the joins... you can generate actual plans for those without affecting the data. –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 25 '13 at 21:01
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