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Note: These issues only occur in Firefox or Chrome. IE does not appear to have the same problem.

HTML

    <div id="renewals-div">
        <label for="renewals">Renewals:</label>
        <input type="hidden" name="renewal_count" id="renewal_count" value="0">
        <table id="renewals">
            <thead>
                <tr data-num="-1" class="header">
                    <th class="date_column">Date</th>
                    <th class="details_column">Details</th>
                </tr>
            </thead>
            <tbody>
                <!-- rows populated by ajax call on load -->
            </tbody>
        </table>
        <br>
        <label for="add_renewal-div"></label> <!-- spacer -->
        <span id="renewal_buttons-span">
            <button type="button" id="add_renewal">Add</button>
            <button type="button" id="remove_renewal">Remove</button>
        </span>
    </div>

CSS

form {
    width: 100%;
    padding-left: 2em;
}

form fieldset {
    border: none;
    margin: 0 0;
    padding: 0 0;
}

form div {
    box-sizing: border-box;
    width: 100%;
    margin-bottom: .2em;
}

form label {
    display: inline-block;
    padding-bottom: 10px;
    width: 30%;
    max-width: 15em;
    vertical-align: top;
}

form input[type=submit] {
    /*float: left;*/
    width: 75px;
    height: 35px;
}

.radio_group {
    width: 70%;
}

form input[type=text] {
    width: 50%;
    max-width: 400px;
    display: inline-block;
}

/* Renewals table and other stuff */
table {
    table-layout:fixed;
    width: 51%;
    max-width: 404px;
    border-collapse: collapse;
    display: inline-block;
}

table td, table th {
    text-align: center;
    vertical-align: middle;
    border: 1px solid black;
}

table input {
    box-sizing: border-box;
    -webkit-box-sizing:border-box;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    width: 95% !important;
    margin: 3px 3px;
}

table tr:hover:not(.selected):not(.header) {
    background-color: #D6ADFF;
}

table .selected {
    background-color: #522D80;
    color: white;
}

.header {
    width: 100%;
}

.date_column {
    width: 25%;
}

.details_column {
    width: 75%;
}

#renewal_buttons-span button {
    width: 5em;
    height: 2.5em;
}

/*********************************/

div.ui-datepicker {
    font-size:10px;
}
/*@media (max-width: 650px) {*/

JS

    $('#remove_renewal').click(function() {
        var next = $('.selected').next('tr');
        $('.selected').remove();
        if (next.length === 0) {
            $('#renewals tbody tr').last().click();
        } else {
            next.click();
        }
    });

My issue is with the "Renewals:" table. I am allowing the user to add and delete rows to the table. By default two test rows are loaded on page load. If you remove both of them, suddenly the table columns no longer respect their width properties. Since the <th> columns are the only ones left, I assume they are the ones not honoring my width setting. How can I get them to honor width even when no rows exist?

EDIT: The side issue below is resolved. I misunderstood CSS selectors as overwriting each other based on the last one in the CSS file. Apparently the styles are decided by the selector that is the most specific. By changing my second selector to input[type=text] it was specific enough to override the previous one without the use of !important.

Side issue: I have a second problem with the width of the input boxes in the table. I have two CSS selectors affecting input width:

form input[type=text] {
    width: 50%;
    max-width: 400px;
    display: inline-block;
}

table input {
    box-sizing: border-box;
    -webkit-box-sizing:border-box;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    width: 95% !important;
    margin: 3px 3px;
}

As you can see, the selector setting the width to 95% comes after the previous one so it should take precedence. However, if I take out the !important the 50% width overrides the 95%! In CSS, I thought that for conflicting styles, the last one declared/selected wins? So why do I still need !important since the style I want to be applied is last?

share|improve this question
3  
"Rather than post code". Post your code, other people may have the same issue. – Christopher Marshall Jan 25 '13 at 20:01
    
For me, using IE9, the columns in the title maintain their widths after the other to rows are removed. – James Curran Jan 25 '13 at 20:02
    
Same as James. I too am using IE9 – Ryan Beaulieu Jan 25 '13 at 20:03
    
Your table is displayed has an inline-block Display it has a table. – Milche Patern Jan 25 '13 at 20:07
1  
The whole table's width is only defined by those two input fields, if they're gone. The table collapses. – godesign Jan 25 '13 at 20:16

I set a width on the #date_col and was able to prevent the collapse

I notice that .header doesn't have any styles associated with it, so you could try putting a width value in it and then letting the two cells fill its parent container. One is at 25% and the other at 75%, but they don't have a parent to reference.

The !important declaration is a symptom of a specificity war with ID selectors and can turn into a mess. I'd encourage you to use classes instead of ID's to prevent this problem.

I think this article explains it well. Towards the bottom

share|improve this answer
    
I've revised the question. I'd appreciate if you could take another look at it. Also, I already have width set on the date and details columns but they still collapse. – Daniel Jan 28 '13 at 18:09

If you want to know why you need important, remove it.

Then, in Chrome, go to development tools. Inspect the element that has the problem. In the right hand panel, in "Styles", you will see that property crossed.

Now, go to Computed Style, the panel above.

Go to the property; in this case width. deploy it pressing the arrow, and you will see what is the guilty rule

share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't tell me why I need it, just what style is being applied if I don't add it. I've updated the question to be more specific in asking "why" important is required when the style I want is the last one being applied. – Daniel Jan 28 '13 at 18:09
    
The rule about the last one is more about different settings inside the selector. When talking about selectors, there are rules that give scores to every selector that you put. Usually the more specific wins. The easy way (but no accurate) to calculate how specific a selector is looking at how many things you specify. form input[type=text] has 3, table input has 2 – vals Jan 28 '13 at 19:42
    
Is there any exact way to determine which styles will be applied based on two selectors that select the same object in a different way? I was able to remove !important after specifying that the table input select for input[type=text] which was specific enough I guess. Thanks for the explanation! – Daniel Jan 28 '13 at 19:49

My answer was deleted by a moderator, and converted to a 'comment'

i first noticed your table is displayed has an inline-block.

Try display:table. All the mechanics of TABLE layout will obey.

table {
    border-collapse: collapse;
    display: table; /* you can even remove this part*/
    max-width: 404px;
    table-layout: fixed;
    width: 51%;
}

To make it keep layout with it's label, just float the previous label left.

Carry on

share|improve this answer
    
So I should've mentioned that. I realize taking inline-block off it would work. But then the table also shifts down below the "Renewals" label. I was counting on the inline style to keep them on the same line. If I change the display back to block, how can I still keep the renewals label and table on the same line? – Daniel Jan 28 '13 at 18:22
    
Is it "best practice" to use floats like that though? If I float that label, I would float the rest of them to be uniform. Then I would also have to float all of the divs (that represent the rows) so that the labels are kept to one to a row. – Daniel Jan 29 '13 at 16:29

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