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Here is my code :

final int g = 0;

ExecutorService threadPool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    threadPool.submit(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            g++;
            myFunc(g);
        }
    });
}

Obviously this doesn't work because of concurrent access on the variable g.

I've tried a lot of things, but didn't manage to find a nice and easy way to fix it. Any solutions ?

Thanks.

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1  
Every time that a thread works on a resource that's shared with other threads, you **must** synchronize. (Or use a higher-level API that does it behind the scenes, like in jdb's answer.) This is to ensure atomicity, and to make threads synchronize their local caches together (otherwise, one thread is not guaranteed to see the value updated from the others). Never do multithreading without synchronized or volatile. For more information, see The Java Tutorials - Lesson: Concurrency. –  ignis Jan 25 '13 at 20:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In your example g is a primitive constant so you cannot change it. On the other side it has to be a constant in order to be accessed from the Runnable implementation. If you want to modify it you have to use some thread safe class like AtomicInteger.

Try this:

    final AtomicInteger g = new AtomicInteger()

    ExecutorService threadPool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        threadPool.submit(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                int local = g.incrementAndGet();
                myFunc(local);
            }
        });
    }
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1  
+1 For posterity, please explain what you are doing differently and why g++ is not a good idea. –  Gray Jan 25 '13 at 20:35

In your example, you could move the declaration of g into the for loop, assign i to the final g, and use that in run().

ExecutorService threadPool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
  final int g = i+1;
  threadPool.submit(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
      myFunc(g);
    }
  });
}
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