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I am building up trigonometry tables, due to the fact that after some testing it appears the native implementation of sin and cos is rather slow. I just use a basic:

    SIN_TABLE = new double[360];
    COS_TABLE = new double[360];
    for(int i = 0; i < 360; i++){
        SIN_TABLE[i] = Math.sin(i);
        COS_TABLE[i] = Math.cos(i);
    }

For the SIN and COS tables using static initialization. Now, a problem occurred when attempting to create the atan table. I am wondering if there is a way that is can be resolved so I can calculate the angle between 2 points (Assuming +x is the second line), yet not get a large decrease in performance.

A way I have considered doing it, would be to store the ratio given for each angle. It would take a long time though to find it and would return 2 possible answers, n and n+180 (Angle in degrees), seeing as tan is positive in the first and third quadrant.

What would be the best way to approach such problem, or would it be better just to accept the fact that the performance decrease is inevitable?

Thanks,

Legend

share|improve this question
1  
... Math.Sin and Math.cos both expect their arguments in radians. In other news, I have NO idea what you're asking, or what your goal is. – FrankieTheKneeMan Jan 25 '13 at 20:44
    
"I am wondering if there is a way that is can be resolved so I can calculate the angle between 2 points (Assuming +x is the second line), yet not get a large decrease in performance." I've noticed reading the question before trying to answer it helps. – user1181445 Jan 25 '13 at 20:45
    
Legend, please don't get defensive. I read your question thrice. You can calculate the angle between two points in a lot of ways - and I can't figure out whether you mean between two points on a circle (when taken relative to the center), or two random points in a cartesian plane.... or what. – FrankieTheKneeMan Jan 25 '13 at 20:47
    
Cartesian planes of course. A circle would be quite easy to find out. – user1181445 Jan 25 '13 at 20:48
    
As is a cartesian plane. atan((y1-y2)/(x1-x2))* 180/PI – FrankieTheKneeMan Jan 25 '13 at 20:51

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