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Have a nice day,

I have some class structure for the project I build for my company. At some point, I've seen a "usually unwanted" slicing of derived object could actually make my code efficient. Please observe:

class Base {
  private:
    int myType; //some constant here
  public:
    Base(): myType(1)
    { 
       if(someTest()) 
       { 
         myTest = 0; // signifies that this object is not working well for me
       }  // if the test succeeds, now I know this is a TYPE1 object
    }

    virtual bool someTest() { /* does make some validation tests */ } 
    int GetMyType() { return myType; }

    // some more virtual functions follow
}

class Derived: public Base {
  public:
    Derived() : Base() 
    { 
      if( someTest() /*calls the derived*/ ) 
      { 
        myType =2; // signifies that this is a TYPE2 object
        /* Do something more*/ 
      }  
    }

    virtual bool someTest() { /* does make OTHER validation tests */ } 
}

Now, if someTest() at Derived fails, this shows that my object is actually of Base type (myType = 1) or an faulty object (myType =0). Since these stuff are at constructors, and since I cannot use exception handling (embedded system); I thought of this:

{ 
  // this is the object holder test block
  // there is some latch - Base* - above = let's call it "ObjectHolder"
  extern Base* ObjectHolder;


  Derived * deriv = new Derived();
  int dType = deriv->GetMyType() ;
  if( dType == 1) // if test at base succeded but the one in derived failed
     Base = & static_cast<Base> (*deriv); // specifically slice the object
  else if(dType =2) 
     Base = deriv;
  else
     delete deriv; // this is a TYPE0 - nonworking- object so don't latch it

  // use other implemented methods to do work ...

}

Now, why have I got such a design? Well, while I was designing the classes, since the methods of inner workings of "Base" (type 1) and "Derived" (type 2) classes differ (and there is a possibilty of type 3,4,5.... objects that are also different in inside) and since I didn't want to make and "if-then-else" check in every single method; I thought I'd make such a design and make the differing methods virtual so they could be called correctly (with thanks to polymorphism) whilst the common methods can be at some Base class.

But now, firstly, I'm not sure if that weird syntax ( & static_cast < Base > *deriv ) is correct (tested and seemed like working but I just want to make sure this is not because of luck); and secondly, I'm not sure if this is the "suggested method" to achive this - I kinda suspect that this syntax can cause memory leaks or something...

Please enlighten me about it.

Thanks

EDIT: Changed code a little bit (also corrected syntax) to make the problem clearer.

EDIT2: Now, since the &(static_cast(*deriv)) is a faulty approach, I was thinking if I can make a "copy constructor" which bypasses the check at the Base class (which is actually the reason I try these stuff - I don't want that test to be run in some cases). Like below:

class Base { 
    // other stuff is like above

    // cc:
    Base(const Base &other) : myType(other.myType)
    {
         // no test is performed here!
    }

    // like other one above
}

With this written, I think I can do that now at the test block:

{ 
   // the code above

   if( dType == 1) // if test at base succeded but the one in derived failed
     Base = new Base(*deriv); // specifically slice the object with cc

    // code goes on ... 
}

What about this?

share|improve this question
    
So, it looks like you have a container (queue?) of things that you want to take action on, but you don't want them to all derive from the same base. In this sense you created a function getType() to tell you what to cast to? Perhaps a variant is what you need here, then you can use a visitor pattern to dispatch the appropriate action. –  Alex Jan 25 '13 at 21:04
    
Well not exactly "a queue" but I am calling a virtual member method for the "test" then by some getType () method I'm casting them... However the cast syntax above looked weird to me... –  Ahmet Ipkin Jan 25 '13 at 21:22
2  
The code in the question should not compile, and if it would it would cause undefined behavior. static_cast<Base>(*deriv) creates a temporary, you cannot obtain the address of the temporary, and if you could, at the end of the full expression, the temporary would go away leaving Base pointing to a destroyed object while the original dynamically allocated Derived would be leaked. Bad idea. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 25 '13 at 23:02
    
Yeah, thanks. I think, instead of casting, I should write a copy constructor to the Base class - which bypasses the check at the base class constructor. I forgot to add the check I do at the Base constructor to the code above - but yeah, there was some check at there that tests the object on creation - which also runs when a derived object is created (due to the constructor it is) - makes that check run twice during testing period, which makes the test run twice redundantly... I guess a copy-constructor would fix that, huh? –  Ahmet Ipkin Jan 26 '13 at 8:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Surely, if you want to create two types of objects, the correct way is to have a factory function that contains the "if (sometest)" and then creates the correct object type:

 Base* factory(...) 
 {
     if(sometest())
     {
         return new Derived;
     }
     else
     {
          return new Base;
     }
 }

That way, you don't unnecessarily create the derived type of object when you actually want a Base type object. Bear in mind also that if you slice the object, your vtable associated with Derived objects that have been sliced will still be a Derived vtable.

Edit: Here's some code to show the problem with slicing:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Base
{
public:
    virtual void func() { cout << "Base" << endl; }
};


class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    virtual void func() { cout << "Derived" << endl; }
};


int main()
{
    Base *list[10];
    for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        if (i % 2)
        {
            list[i] = new Base;
        }
        else
        {
            list[i] = new Derived;
        }
    }

    list[2] = &*(static_cast<Base*>(list[2]));

    for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        list[i]->func();
    }
    return 0;
}

Output:

Derived
Base
Derived     <- should have changed to "Base" if questio was "right".
Base
Derived
Base
Derived
Base
Derived
Base

Using the syntax for "slicing" as given in the original question: &(static_cast<Base>(*list[2])); (as per adapted to the code posted here), givesn an error in both clang++ and g++ compiler. The essence of the message is the same. This is clang's variant:

error: taking the address of a temporary object of type 'Base'
share|improve this answer
    
+1. But saying that the vtable is still the derived vtable do you mean that calling an overriden function on a sliced object would lead to a pure virtual call or some error alike ? –  Stephane Rolland Jan 25 '13 at 20:39
    
I'm saying it would call the derived class function - at least if the compiler is putting a pointer to the vtable as the first member of the class, as all compilers I know does - gcc, armcc, MS Visual Studio - I haven't looked at clang, but I expect it does too. –  Mats Petersson Jan 25 '13 at 20:43
    
Actually, I just tested that if I use the syntax I use, it makes it call "the base versions" of the virtual methods - which is the reason I want that slicing (with that & static_cast <Base> *deriv). If I simply assign, the derived versions are used (which is the definition of polymorphism). My concern is if this hack would case some run-time errors later, or cause some memory leak or something. I didn't use that factory method, because the derived classes are still obligated to call the base class constructors. Perhaps I could make "versions" of them, but I simply didn't do that :) –  Ahmet Ipkin Jan 25 '13 at 20:44
    
@AhmetIpkin I don't think there is anything in the C++ standard that guarantee any behaviour when an object is sliced, most probably it states that it's should just act like the base object. Don't take my word for this, I haven't checked. However, I feel like it is a terrorist behaviour. Even if this works, I don't think you can ask for your common C++ colleagues to understand your code, and this a bad thing for me. It's my opinion: even if it worked, it's a bad thing to do. –  Stephane Rolland Jan 25 '13 at 20:50
1  
clang gives "taking the address of a temporary object of type 'Base'" for this. Same error I got from gcc with my interpretation of your original code. –  Mats Petersson Jan 25 '13 at 21:27

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