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This is happening over and over again. I'm just sitting here not running any code and it happens. I look in the event viewer, and it looks like its trying to run the code from one of my classes.

Application: devenv.exe
Framework Version: v4.0.30319
 Description: The process was terminated due to an unhandled exception.
 Exception Info: System.ArgumentNullException
 Stack:
    at System.Data.Linq.DataContext..ctor(System.String, System.Data.Linq.Mapping.MappingSource)
    at TurnbackTools.DataClasses1DataContext..ctor(System.String)
    at TurnbackChart.TurnbackChart.ZDraw()
    at TurnbackChart.TurnbackChart.TimerTick(System.Object, System.EventArgs)
    at System.Windows.Forms.Timer.OnTick(System.EventArgs)
    at System.Windows.Forms.Timer+TimerNativeWindow.WndProc(System.Windows.Forms.Message ByRef)
    at System.Windows.Forms.NativeWindow.DebuggableCallback(IntPtr, Int32, IntPtr, IntPtr)

What is going on here?

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I'd guess System.Data.Linq.Mapping.MappingSource object is null –  Aniket Jan 25 '13 at 20:34
1  
that's because crappy winforms designer creates an instance of your form to show in the designer, try to make sure your code does not execute if InDesignerMode. –  HighCore Jan 25 '13 at 20:34
    
reboot your computer ;) –  MUG4N Jan 25 '13 at 20:41

2 Answers 2

"Microsoft Visual Studio has Stopped Working" is not the error I see. The one I see says there was an null argument specified when it's not allowed (System.ArgumentNullException).

You've got the entire call stack there. And, in the debugger, you can click through them to find the line where the argument is null.

This is actually quite trivial to isolate once you become comfortable using the debugger. Of course, it's possible that resolving it is more complex, but you should at least start by narrowing down what is causing the error.

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It is also baseline. Kind of a taxi driver telling you the car is broken when it is out of gas - this type of debugging is what programmers do every day. –  TomTom Jan 25 '13 at 20:37
    
I've figured it out. My code was creating a TIMER. Then it was not DISPOSING the timer when the application stopped. Then after the application was stopped, i.e. I went back to writing code, the timer events kept on firing. The events were occuring and throwing exceptions when the app was not running. –  jerrylagrou Mar 21 '13 at 15:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've figured it out. My code was creating a TIMER. Then it was not DISPOSING the timer when the application stopped. Then after the application was stopped, i.e. I went back to writing code, the timer events kept on firing. The events were occuring and throwing exceptions when the app was not running

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