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Is this the most elegant way to express a isPrime function for BigInt objects?

Here's what I have for regular integers:

  def isPrimeForInt(n: Int): Boolean = {
    val ceiling = math.sqrt(n.toDouble).toInt
    (2 until ceiling) forall (x => n % x != 0)
  }

Here's what I have for BigInts:

  def isPrimeForBigInt(n: BigInt): Boolean = {
    def ceiling: BigInt = {
      def f(a: BigInt): Stream[BigInt] = a #:: f(a+1)
      f(BigInt(1)).dropWhile(_.pow(2) < n)(0)
    }
    Range.BigInt(BigInt(2), ceiling , BigInt(1)) forall (x => n % x != 0)
  }
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1  
Is this for an actual primality tester? 'Cause if it is and you actually need arbitrary precision for the numbers you'll be testing, then only the probabilistic primality-testing algorithms are feasible. –  Randall Schulz Jan 25 '13 at 20:51
    
@Randall this is a primality tester for java BigIntegers –  Alex Jan 25 '13 at 21:31
1  
Then I recommend you learn about tractable probabilistic primality testing for large integers. Also, I'd convert the Java BigInteger to Scala BigInt, do the work and then convert back to return the Java BigInteger. –  Randall Schulz Jan 25 '13 at 22:19
    
@Randall correction, for scala BigInt (I assumed BigInt is a scala implementation of Java BigInteger, but I should have been more precise). –  Alex Jan 25 '13 at 22:35
    
for big integersyou should use MillerRabin test en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miller%E2%80%93Rabin_primality_test. It takes way less than second to test 10^700 + 7. Only disadvantage is that it is probablistic and can yield false positive, but that is small probabilty and can be avoided with correct implementation. –  Luka Rahne Jan 27 '13 at 9:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is my primality checker for BigInts:

private static Boolean isSpsp(BigInteger n, BigInteger a)
{
    BigInteger two = BigInteger.valueOf(2);
    BigInteger n1 = n.subtract(BigInteger.ONE);
    BigInteger d = n1;
    int s = 0;

    while (d.mod(two).equals(BigInteger.ZERO))
    {
        d = d.divide(two);
        s += 1;
    }

    BigInteger t = a.modPow(d, n);

    if (t.equals(BigInteger.ONE) || t.equals(n1))
    {
        return true;
    }

    while (--s > 0)
    {
        t = t.multiply(t).mod(n);
        if (t.equals(n1))
        {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

public static Boolean isPrime(BigInteger n)
{
    Random r = new Random();
    BigInteger two = BigInteger.valueOf(2);
    BigInteger n3 = n.subtract(BigInteger.valueOf(3));
    BigInteger a;
    int k = 25;

    if (n.compareTo(two) < 0)
    {
        return false;
    }

    if (n.mod(two).equals(BigInteger.ZERO))
    {
        return n.equals(two);
    }

    while (k > 0)
    {
        a = new BigInteger(n.bitLength(), r).add(two);
        while (a.compareTo(n) >= 0)
        {
            a = new BigInteger(n.bitLength(), r).add(two);
        }

        if (! isSpsp(n, a))
        {
            return false;
        }

        k -= 1;
    }

    return true;
}

You can read more about it at my Programming with Prime Numbers essay.

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You change Int for BigInt in your first example. Why are you rewriting it?

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Because he wants to compute primes, that exceed 2147483647 (Int.MaxValue)? (But maybe there is a place for Long). –  om-nom-nom Jan 25 '13 at 20:46
    
Since the OP is taking the square root, it works up to 64-bit integer range. Then arguably there is no point in trying to iterate over a range greater than 0x7FFFFFFF to check for divisibility. My guess was that the OP just happens to have BigInts but doesn't want to compute primes with 1000 digits. –  0__ Jan 25 '13 at 21:28
    
@0__ projecteuler.net/problem=3 –  Alex Jan 25 '13 at 21:41
1  
@Alex - but then Long is sufficient –  0__ Jan 25 '13 at 21:54
1  
@0__ thank you!! ... but still, I'm curious about what this would look like with big integers. –  Alex Jan 25 '13 at 22:15

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