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With one of my projects I will head into the C++ field. Basically I am coming from a Java background and was wondering how the concept of Java packages is realized in the C++ world. This led me to the C++ concept of namespaces.

I am absolutely fine with namespaces so far but when it comes to header files things are becoming kind of inefficient with respect to fully qualified class names, using-directives and using-declarations.

A very good description of the issue is this article by Herb Sutter.

As I understand it this all boils down to: If you write a header file always use fully qualified type names to refer to types from other namespaces.

This is almost unacceptable. As a C++ header commonly provides the declaration of a class, a maximum of readability has top priority. Fully qualifying each type from a different namespace creates a lot of visual noise, finally diminishing readability of the header to a degree which raises the question whether to use namespaces at all.

Nevertheless I want to take advantage of C++ namespaces and so put some thought into the question: How to overcome the namespace evil of C++ header files? After some research I think typedefs could be a valid cure to this problem.

Following you will find a C++ sample program which demonstrates how I would like to use public class scoped typedefs to import types from other namespaces. The program is syntactically correct and compiles fine on MinGW W64. So far so good, but I am not sure whether this approach happily removes the using keyword from the header but brings in another problem which I am simply not aware of. Just something tricky like the things described by Herb Sutter.

That is I kindly ask everybody who has a thorough understanding of C++ to review the code below and let me know whether this should work or not. Thanks for your thoughts.

MyFirstClass.hpp

#ifndef MYFIRSTCLASS_HPP_
#define MYFIRSTCLASS_HPP_

namespace com {
namespace company {
namespace package1 {

class MyFirstClass
{
public:
    MyFirstClass();
    ~MyFirstClass();

private:

};

} // namespace package1
} // namespace company
} // namespace com

#endif /* MYFIRSTCLASS_HPP_ */

MyFirstClass.cpp

#include "MyFirstClass.hpp"

using com::company::package1::MyFirstClass;

MyFirstClass::MyFirstClass()
{
}

MyFirstClass::~MyFirstClass()
{
}

MySecondClass.hpp

#ifndef MYSECONDCLASS_HPP_
#define MYSECONDCLASS_HPP_

#include <string>
#include "MyFirstClass.hpp"

namespace com {
namespace company {
namespace package2 {

    /*
     * Do not write using-declarations in header files according to
     * Herb Sutter's Namespace Rule #2.
     *
     * using std::string; // bad
     * using com::company::package1::MyFirstClass; // bad
     */

class MySecondClass{

public:
    /*
     * Public class-scoped typedefs instead of using-declarations in
     * namespace package2. Consequently we can avoid fully qualified
     * type names in the remainder of the class declaration. This
     * yields maximum readability and shows cleanly the types imported
     * from other namespaces.
     */
    typedef std::string String;
    typedef com::company::package1::MyFirstClass MyFirstClass;

    MySecondClass();
    ~MySecondClass();

    String getText() const; // no std::string required
    void setText(String as_text); // no std::string required

    void setMyFirstInstance(MyFirstClass anv_instance); // no com::company:: ...
    MyFirstClass getMyFirstInstance() const; // no com::company:: ...

private:
    String is_text; // no std::string required
    MyFirstClass inv_myFirstInstance; // no com::company:: ...
};

} // namespace package2
} // namespace company
} // namespace com

#endif /* MYSECONDCLASS_HPP_ */

MySecondClass.cpp

#include "MySecondClass.hpp"

/*
 * According to Herb Sutter's "A Good Long-Term Solution" it is fine
 * to write using declarations in a translation unit, as long as they
 * appear after all #includes.
 */
using com::company::package2::MySecondClass; // OK because in cpp file and
                                             // no more #includes following
MySecondClass::MySecondClass()
{
}

MySecondClass::~MySecondClass()
{
}

/*
 * As we have already imported all types through the class scoped typedefs
 * in our header file, we are now able to simply reuse the typedef types
 * in the translation unit as well. This pattern shortens all type names
 * down to a maximum of "ClassName::TypedefTypeName" in the translation unit -
 * e.g. below we can simply write "MySecondClass::String". At the same time the
 * class declaration in the header file now governs all type imports from other
 * namespaces which again enforces the DRY - Don't Repeat Yourself - principle.
 */

// Simply reuse typedefs from MySecondClass
MySecondClass::String MySecondClass::getText() const
{
    return this->is_text;
}

// Simply reuse typedefs from MySecondClass
void MySecondClass::setText(String as_text)
{
    this->is_text = as_text;
}

// Simply reuse typedefs from MySecondClass
void MySecondClass::setMyFirstInstance(MyFirstClass anv_instance)
{
    this->inv_myFirstInstance = anv_instance;
}

// Simply reuse typedefs from MySecondClass
MySecondClass::MyFirstClass MySecondClass::getMyFirstInstance() const
{
    return this->inv_myFirstInstance;
}

Main.cpp

#include <cstdio>
#include "MySecondClass.hpp"

using com::company::package2::MySecondClass; // OK because in cpp file and
                                             // no more #includes following
int main()
{
    // Again MySecondClass provides all types which are imported from
    // other namespaces and are part of its interface through public
    // class scoped typedefs
    MySecondClass *lpnv_mySecCls = new MySecondClass();

    // Again simply reuse typedefs from MySecondClass
    MySecondClass::String ls_text = "Hello World!";
    MySecondClass::MyFirstClass *lpnv_myFirClsf =
            new MySecondClass::MyFirstClass();

    lpnv_mySecCls->setMyFirstInstance(*lpnv_myFirClsf);

    lpnv_mySecCls->setText(ls_text);
    printf("Greetings: %s\n", lpnv_mySecCls->getText().c_str());

    lpnv_mySecCls->setText("Goodbye World!");
    printf("Greetings: %s\n", lpnv_mySecCls->getText().c_str());

    getchar();

    delete lpnv_myFirClsf;
    delete lpnv_mySecCls;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
6  
This isn't really a question. Maybe you should post to code review? –  Mike Jan 25 '13 at 20:51
9  
Use fully qualified names and don't create Java-like namespace names. Don't use new. Welcome to C++. –  Seth Carnegie Jan 25 '13 at 20:52
3  
just don't use so many levels of namespace, I've rarely seen an actual need beyond one level. the com::company part is especially meaningless. –  KillianDS Jan 25 '13 at 20:53
21  
Forget what you know about Java. Don't nest namespaces so much. Don't use new when you don't need it (the example code does not need it). Trying to write C++ as if it was Java will not produce good results. Don't pretend the languages are similar, because they are not. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 25 '13 at 20:55
2  
@SethCarnegie: Yeah. Typedef:ing std::string is pointless and obfuscating. Typedeffing template classes and containers is something I find useful though –  Macke Jan 25 '13 at 21:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Pain is mitigated by reducing complexity. You're bending C++ into Java. (That works just as bad as trying the other way.)

Some hints:

  • Remove the "com" namespace level. (This is just a java-ism that you don't need)
  • Drop the "company" namespace, maybe replace by "product" or "library" namespace (i.e. boost, Qt, OSG, etc). Just pick something that's unique w.r.t. the other libs you're using.
  • You don't need to fully declare names that are in the same namespace you're in (caveat emptor: template classe, see comment). Just avoid any using namespace directives in the headers. (And use with care in C++ files, if at all. Inside functions is preferred.)
  • Consider namespace aliases (in functions/cpp files), i.e namespace bll = boost::lambda;. This creates shortcuts that are quite neat.
  • Also, by hiding private members/types using the pimpl pattern, your header have less types to expose.

P.S: Thanks to @KillianDS a few good tips in comments (that were deleted when I edited them into the question.)

share|improve this answer
    
@Macke I would insist on avoiding the using namespace directive. This behaviour helps against name collision. Otherwise namespaces become less powerful. (I use using namespace only in cpp files where it has an added value) –  Stephane Rolland Jan 25 '13 at 21:00
2  
@StephaneRolland: I thought that was what I wrote? –  Macke Jan 25 '13 at 21:02
    
the first time I read (maybe before the edits) it was not stressed enough. Maybe it's just me :-). That's why I used the word insist. –  Stephane Rolland Jan 25 '13 at 21:10
    
@StephaneRolland: N.p. ;) –  Macke Jan 25 '13 at 21:25
1  
"You don't need to fully declare names that are in the same namespace you're in." You do if you're writing a template – ADL can cause ambiguities where you least expect them. –  ildjarn Jan 25 '13 at 22:00

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