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I'm getting an error in WinImp.h that says 'Root' has not been declared. If I don't use the scope operator (class WinImp : public BaseDef) the error is error: expected class-name before '{' token). Anyone know why this is happening?

Root.h

class Root {
    public:
        class BaseDef {
            public:
                virtual void foo() = 0;
                virtual void bar() = 0;
        };
    private:
        #ifdef _WIN32
        friend class WinImp;
        #else
        friend class NixImp;
        #endif

        BaseDef* imp;

        BaseDef* getImp();

    public:
        Root() : imp(getImp()) {}
        void foo();
        void bar();
};

Root.cpp

#include "Root.h"
void Root::foo() {
    imp->foo();
}

void Root::bar() {
    imp->bar();
}

WinImp.h

#ifdef _WIN32
#include "Root.h"
class WinImp : public Root::BaseDef {
    public:
        void foo();
        void bar();
};
#endif

WinImp.cpp

#include "WinImp.h"
#ifdef _WIN32
    void WinImp::foo() {

    }

    void WinImp::bar() {

    }

    Root::BaseDef* Root::getImp() {
        return static_cast<BaseDef*>(new WinImp());
    }
#endif
share|improve this question
4  
Because BaseDef has namespace visibility restricted to Root. You have to qualify its namespace to gain access to it. Also, you should not need Root:: in front of your WinImp::foo() and WinImp::bar() definitions. – WhozCraig Jan 25 '13 at 21:40
4  
Unrelated: don’t use dynamic_cast for up-casts. Only use it for downcasts, and even then only when you are not sure whether the cast is going to succeed (because the dynamic type isn’t known) and you are actually checking whether the cast’s return value is != nullptr. Upcasts are implicit and downcasts where the dynamic type is known should use static_cast. – Konrad Rudolph Jan 25 '13 at 21:44
1  
You're doing it in your code already (the class WinImp : public Root::BaseDef is what finds BaseDef as a nested class of Root). In other words, you actually solved the problem yourself. I stripped down a cut of your post and put it here if you want to see it clearer. (your code ma be clouding what you are actually seeing). – WhozCraig Jan 25 '13 at 21:57
1  
@which line? your question first-paragraph and your actual code body declare class WinImp differently (which you need to fix). The question body (class WinImp : public BaseDef) is wrong; the one in the code (class WinImp : public Root::BaseDef ) is right. However, I would advise making those methods in BaseDef public, or at least protected. – WhozCraig Jan 25 '13 at 22:00
1  
Ok, that is indeed odd. The sample I linked assumes all your includes are lined up correctly. Can you verify the Root.h that you're including in WinImp.h (and thereby WinImp.cpp) is indeed the Root.h that has your class Root definition? Easy enough. Temporarily stick a #error RootIncluded in Root.h right before the class decl, then manually compile only WinImp.cpp if it doesn't break, then somehow you're including the wrong Root.h. – WhozCraig Jan 25 '13 at 22:07

You are accessing BaseDef interfaces in Root, so they suppose to be public:

class BaseDef 
{
 public:
   virtual void foo() = 0;
   virtual void bar() = 0;
};

In WinImp.cpp, foo(), bar() need return type and they are not inside Root scope, should be:

void WinImp::foo() { }
void WinImp::bar() { }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I guess that was me just being lazy. It was correct in my actual code./ – Eliezer Jan 27 '13 at 0:16

Fix WinImp.cpp to look like this:

#include "WinImp.h"
#ifdef _WIN32
    // WinImp is not scoped within Root
    void WinImp::foo() {

    }

    void WinImp::bar() {

    }

    Root::BaseDef* Root::getImp() {
        return dynamic_cast<BaseDef*>(new WinImp());
    }
#endif
share|improve this answer
    
foo,bar need return types – billz Jan 25 '13 at 22:32
    
Thanks, @billz. – moswald Jan 25 '13 at 22:41
    
@moswald Thanks, I don't know why I had WinImp scoped within Root. However, I don't understand why I should scope getImp() within WinImp. It's a member function of Root. – Eliezer Jan 27 '13 at 0:15
    
Oh jeez, I should seriously edit my answer. This is what I get for visiting SO while I've got the flu. For some reason I was thinking getImp was virtual. – moswald Jan 27 '13 at 2:16

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