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I really like Grails' resources plugin, and we are using it extensively with our project in Grails 2.2. I now want to extend this a bit to be environment-aware, so that, for example, I can avoid loading certian javascript libraries in Production that are really only needed for Development and Testing.

According to Grails documentation (http://grails-plugins.github.com/grails-resources/guide/3.%20Declaring%20resources.html#3.2%20Resource%20artefacts) this should be trivial, since these *Resources.groovy files in the grails-app/conf folder are supposed to be Groovy ConfigSlurper scripts (like DataSource.groovy is) and therefore supportive of the "environments" block syntax.

My problem is, trying to implement this style the way the documentation seems to be saying I can only breaks the resources plugin altogether. Coupled with IntelliJ IDEA not recognizing the environments block, I don't see how this is supposed to work. Here's what I'm talking about, in which the environments block is throwing off the entire resources injection:

modules = {
    stuff {
        resource 'js/lib/script1.js'
        resource 'js/lib/script2.js'
    }
}

environments {
    production {
        stuff {
            resource 'js/lib/script1.js'
        }
    }
}

Here, I'm simply trying to have a module that, when run in the production environment, specifically excludes a particular script from the "stuff" resource. If anybody can speak to the correct way to do this, I will be much appreciative! Thanks in advance!

UPDATE!!!

OK, I think I have fiddled and found out the correct way to set the environment-aware resources up. My only problem now is figuring out how to have default resources in a bundle, so that there's not all this duplication across environments. Let's say I have the following setup:

environments {
    development {
        modules = {
            stuff {
                resource 'js/script1.js'
                resource 'js/script2.js'
                resource 'js/OnlyForDevelopment.js'
            }
        }
    }
    production {
        modules = {
            stuff {
                resource 'js/script1.js'
                resource 'js/script2.js'
            }
        }
    }
}

What would be the proper way to write this so that script1 and script2 can be set as defaults for the "stuff" resource bundle, so that they don't have to be written out twice, once for each environment block? This is just a small example, but I would really like to avoid having to duplicate every shared resource for every environment block. Is there a graceful solution for this? Can there be a "generic" resources block, where I can set up a template "stuff" resource that will be the base for anything the environment-aware version adds on? If so, can the environment-aware resources include resources from the generic block with dependsOn statements? I've tried to make these things happen, to no avail.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use dependsOn to separate shared modules.

modules = {

    stuff {
       resource 'js/script1.js'
       resource 'js/script2.js'
    }

    devStuff {
       dependsOn 'stuff'
       resource 'js/OnlyForDevelopment.js'
    }

}

We try to not put environment configuration within our resources files. It feels a little magical and you forget fairly soon which environments go where. It's a bit of a maintenance nightmare.

Instead, in our layouts, we can set modules based on environments,

i.e,

<g:if env='test'>
     <r:use module='testStuff...'/> </g:if> <g:else>
     <r:use module='stuff'/> 
</g:else>

( You get the idea ).

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah we definitely use dependsOn heavily in our configuration. The desire for env-specific resource overrides was never intended for heavy use, only to lighten the load in prod by not loading some script resources altogether (ie, a JavaScript library only needed for testing purposes). Our ultimate solution was to use multiple config groovy files in our grails project configuration folder, allowing ApplicationResources to act as the final aggregated resource list, while referencing resources from other configuration files, some of which have environment blocks with overrides. Cheers! –  AR9 Mar 29 '13 at 22:22

I would choose your alternative, have different Resources.groovy files, one for each environment. That's

GlobalResources.grooy

modules = {
    globalScripts {
        resource 'js/script1.js'
        resource 'js/script2.js'
    }
}

ProductionResources.groovy

environments {
    production {
        modules = {
            stuff {
                dependsOn 'globalScripts'
            }
        }
    }
}

DevelopmentResources.goovy

environments {
    development {
        modules = {
            stuff {
                dependsOn 'globalScripts'
                resource 'js/OnlyForDevelopment.js'
            }
        }
    }
}

I think this is what you were asking for.

ps: I noticed you refer to different resources in the latest answer but I was unsure if this is what you did.

share|improve this answer
    
Does this require any further configuration or is this configuration by convention? –  Charles Wood Nov 13 at 16:38

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