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printf is ouput is being destyoryed by a "\n" after I run scanf. I am attempting to use.

scanf ("%*c");

to chomp the "\n" but its not working... here is the code

    printf("Enter char float int char:", char4, deci2, num2, char5);
    scanf ("%c %f %d %c", &char4, &deci2, &num2, &char5);
    scanf ("%*c");
    printf("You entered: '%c' %.3f %d '%c' " ,char4 ,deci2, num2, char5 );

and it outputs to

    Enter char int char float:a 5 a 5.5
    You entered: 'a' 5 'a' 5.500 
    Enter char float int char:a 5.5 6 b
    You entered: '
    ' 0.000 0 ''
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2  
What are you trying to do in: printf("Enter char float int char:", char4, deci2, num2, char5);? –  Maroun Maroun Jan 25 '13 at 21:56

3 Answers 3

In this line:

printf("Enter char float int char:", char4, deci2, num2, char5);

remove the char4, deci2, num2, and char5. If you're still seeing issues as Carl Norum suggests, then try consuming the newline character left over from your first scanf as such:

scanf ("%c %f %d %c", &char4, &deci2, &num2, &char5);
getchar();
printf("You entered: '%c' %.3f %d '%c' " ,char4 ,deci2, num2, char5 );
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+1 so you reach 8000 (and for the answer of course..) ;) –  Maroun Maroun Jan 25 '13 at 21:58
1  
That line of code is wrong, but isn't the OP's problem, I think. –  Carl Norum Jan 25 '13 at 21:59
    
@CarlNorum - I checked it quick and the code works for me after that change. However there could defiantly be more than one problem. –  Mike Jan 25 '13 at 22:02
    
@Mike, that's because he didn't provide enough code. If you left that stuff in, it would work exactly the same for you. Deleting those won't change any behaviour on most compilers (though it does, technically speaking, cause undefined behaviour). –  Carl Norum Jan 25 '13 at 22:02
    
opps. lol. quietly finishing my cup of coffee. Thank you. Still getting the ` You entered: ' ' 0.000 0 ''1` as the output. –  user1787331 Jan 25 '13 at 22:03

The line

scanf ("%c %f %d %c", &char4, &deci2, &num2, &char5);

is picking up the stray newline left in the input buffer from your previous scanf call. You can work around that by putting a space in front of the first %c:

scanf (" %c %f %d %c", &char4, &deci2, &num2, &char5);

This will tell scanf to skip over any leading whitespace (blanks, newlines, tabs, etc.) before reading the next non-whitespace character.

The line

printf("Enter char float int char:", char4, deci2, num2, char5);

is a bit of a head-scratcher; it won't cause any problems (the excess arguments are evaluated, but otherwise ignored), but it looks wrong, and indicates some confusion.

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Thank you! This helped me solve the problem. –  user1787331 Jan 25 '13 at 22:18

It's the remaining \n in the buffer from your first read that's still hanging around. You need to eat that one before doing the second scanf, not after.

Editorial note: You should really include all of the relevant code in your question rather than just a subset. I could only infer this to be your problem from the output you provided. It contains the string Enter char int char float which isn't present in your example code.

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When I saw printf("Enter char float int char:", char4, deci2, num2, char5); I stopped looking at the code :D –  Maroun Maroun Jan 25 '13 at 22:01
    
Sure, that's bad, but it's unlikely to cause problems. –  Carl Norum Jan 25 '13 at 22:01
    
@MarounMaroun when I read this comment, I quit looking at my code, and started looking for my coffee! –  user1787331 Jan 25 '13 at 22:06
1  
@user1787331 lol.. sounds like a good idea ;) –  Maroun Maroun Jan 25 '13 at 22:08
1  
+1 for noticing - You should really include all of the relevant code –  Mike Jan 25 '13 at 22:09

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