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I have a subclass of Hash that adds a new field f. I'd like JSON to serialize and de-serialize f along with the contents of the hash itself, but haven't figured out how to do that:

Class ExtendedHash < Hash
  attr_accessor :f
end

Of course as written, ExtendedHash#to_json does not preserve the the f field:

>> c = ExtendedHash[{:a => 1, :b => 2}]
=> {:a=>1, :b=>2}
>> c.f = 123
=> 123
>> c.to_json
=> "{\"a\":1,\"b\":2}"

So what are the right definitions for:

  def to_json(*a)
    ...
  end
  def self.load_from_json(str)
    ...
  end
end

? (I've looked at 'How can I use Ruby's to_json in a subclass and include super's json?' but that doesn't seem like the right approach here.)

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2 Answers 2

can you do this:

class ExtendedHash < Hash
  attr_accessor :f

  def to_json(*args)
    Hash[self].merge(:f => f).to_json(*args)
  end
end
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+1, beat me to it. –  Dave Newton Jan 25 '13 at 22:19
    
thank you...... –  Iuri G. Jan 25 '13 at 22:28
    
Well, maybe. The f field is intended to be separate from any key-value pair, so the above will fail if the hash already has a key named "f". I could use an obfuscated key that was unlikely to be used in practice, like (:i0have0no0life0 => f), but that doesn't pass the smell test. –  fearless_fool Jan 25 '13 at 22:29
1  
@fearless_fool You'd still use the same methodology, although if you want it separate from the hash I question that the hash subclass is the right place to put it--I'd compose a new class if your class will be exposing non-hash values. –  Dave Newton Jan 25 '13 at 22:37
    
@DaveNewton: fair point. A subclass of Hash feels right in my case, since I want something that does everything that a hash does. But I have figured out a solution which isn't too bad (elsewhere here). –  fearless_fool Jan 25 '13 at 22:57
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The following does the right thing:

require 'json'

class ExtendedHash<Hash
  attr_accessor :f

  def to_json(*a)
    {
      'json_class' => self.class.name,
      'f' => f,
      'super' => super
    }.to_json(*a)
  end

  def self.json_create(s)
    self[JSON.load(s["super"])].tap {|o| o.f = s["f"]}
  end

end

And it works like this:

> x = ExtendedHash["a", 1, "b", 2]
=> {"a"=>1, "b"=>2}
> x.f = 123
=> 123
> s = x.to_json
=> "{\"json_class\":\"ExtendedHash\",\"f\":123,\"super\":\"{\\\"a\\\":1,\\\"b\\\":2}\"}"
> y = JSON.load(s)
=> {"a"=>1, "b"=>2}
> y.f
=> 123

The only thing that's weird about it is that the underlying hash is "doubly-json'ed" that is, converted to a JSON string and then run through JSON again. That creates lots of extra escape characters, and requires an explicit call to JSON.load in the json_create() method.

I can live with that, but maybe there's a better way.

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