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I've noticed I've always used int and doubles no matter how small or big the number needs to be. So in java, is it more efficient to use byte or short instead of int and float instead of double?

So assume I have a program with plenty of ints and doubles Would it be worth going through and changing my ints to bytes or shorts if I knew the number would fit? And the same thing for

I know java doesn't have unsigned types but is there anything extra I could do if I knew the number would be positive only?

By efficient I mostly mean processing. I'd assume the garbage collector would be a lot faster if all the variables would be half size and that calculations would probably be somewhat faster too. ( I guess since I am working on android I need to somewhat worry about ram too)

(I'd assume the garbage collector only deals with Objects and not primitive but still deletes all the primitives in abandoned objects right? )

I tried it with a small android app I have but didn't really notice a difference at all. (though I didn't scientifically measure anything)

Am I wrong in assuming it should be faster and more efficient? I'd hate to go through and change everything in a massive program to find out I wasted my time.

Would it be worth doing from the beginning when I start a new project? (I mean I think every little bit would help but then again if so, why doesn't it seem like anyone does it.)

Thanks so much. This is just an issue that I have been pondering.

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migrated from cs.stackexchange.com Jan 25 '13 at 22:17

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2  
Hello! This usually depends on the target platform (register size etc) and it looks like an off topic question for this site! –  Jernej Jan 25 '13 at 20:39
    
What site would be more appropriate? This seems more like a computer science question than a programming one. Thanks though. –  firesoul453 Jan 25 '13 at 20:48
    
I am not sure but I think stackexchange would be more suitable or perhaps some java related site! Best of luck! –  Jernej Jan 25 '13 at 21:00
1  
@firesoul453 I posted an answer but I suggest you post this on stackoverflow. You are to get more detailed answers from Java experts there. –  saadtaame Jan 25 '13 at 21:01
    
Thanks everyone –  firesoul453 Jan 28 '13 at 22:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Am I wrong in assuming it should be faster and more efficient? I'd hate to go through and change everything in a massive program to find out I wasted my time.

Short answer

Yes, you are wrong. In most cases, it makes little difference in terms of space used.

It is not worth trying to optimize this ... unless you have clear evidence that optimization is needed. And if you do need to optimize memory usage of object fields in particular, you will probably need to talk alternative measures.

Longer answer

The Java Virtual Machine models stacks and object fields using offsets that are (in effect) multiples of a 32 bit primitive cell size. So when you declare a local variable or object field as (say) a byte, the variable / field will be stored in a 32 bit cell, just like an int.

There are two exceptions to this:

  • long and double values require 2 primitive 32-bit cells
  • arrays of primitive types are represent in packed form, so that (for example) an array of bytes hold 4 bytes per 32bit word.

So it might be worth optimizing use of long and double ... and large arrays of primitives. But in general no.

In theory, a JIT might be able to optimize this, but in practice I've never heard of a JIT that does. One impediment is that the JIT typically cannot run until after there instances of the class being compiled have been created. If the JIT optimized the memory layout, you could have two (or more) "flavors" of object of the same class ... and that would present huge difficulties.


Revisitation

Looking at the benchmark results in @meriton's answer, it appears that using short and byte instead of int incurs a performance penalty for multiplication. Indeed, if you consider the operations in isolation, the penalty is significant. (You shouldn't ... but that's another matter.)

I think the explanation is that JIT is probably doing the multiplications using 32bit multiply instructions in each case. But in the byte and short case, it executes extra instructions to convert the intermediate 32 bit value to a byte or short in each loop iteration. (In theory, that conversion could be done once at the end of the loop ... but I doubt that the optimizer would be able to figure that out.)

Anyway, this does point to another problem with switching to short and byte as an optimization. It could make performance worse ... in an algorithm that is arithmetic and compute intensive.

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5  
+1 don't optimize unless you have clear evidence of a performance problem –  Bohemian Jan 26 '13 at 0:29
    
Erm, why does the JVM have to wait for JIT compilation to pack the memory layout of a class? Since the types of fields are written to the class file, couldn't the JVM pick a memory layout at class load time, then resolve field names as byte rather than word offsets? –  meriton Jan 26 '13 at 1:04
    
@meriton - I'm pretty sure that object layouts are determined at class load time, and they don't change after that. See the "fine-print" part of my answer. If actual memory layouts changed when the code was JITed, it would be really difficult for the JVM to deal with. (When I said the JIT might optimize layout, that is hypothetical and impractical ... which could explain why I've never heard of a JIT actually doing it.) –  Stephen C Feb 19 at 22:23
    
I know. I was just trying to point out that even though the memory layouts are hard to change once objects are created, a JVM might still optimize memory layout before that, i.e. at class load time. Put differently, that the JVM spec describes the behaviour of a JVM with word offsets doesn't necessarily imply that a JVM is required to be implemented that way - though most probably are. –  meriton Feb 19 at 23:19
    
@meriton - The JVM spec is talking about "virtual machine word offets" within local frames / objects. How these are mapped to physical machine offsets is NOT specified. Indeed, it cannot specify it ... since there may be hardware-specific field alignment requirements. –  Stephen C Feb 20 at 5:01

That depends on the implementation of the JVM, as well as the underlying hardware. Most modern hardware will not fetch single bytes from memory (or even from the first level cache), i.e. using the smaller primitive types generally does not reduce memory bandwidth consumption. Likewise, modern CPU have a word size of 64 bits. They can perform operations on less bits, but that works by discarding the extra bits, which isn't faster either.

The only benefit is that smaller primitive types can result in a more compact memory layout, most notably when using arrays. This saves memory, which can improve locality of reference (thus reducing the number of cache misses) and reduce garbage collection overhead.

Generally speaking however, using the smaller primitive types is not faster.

To demonstrate that, behold the following benchmark:

package tools.bench;

import java.math.BigDecimal;

public abstract class Benchmark {

    final String name;

    public Benchmark(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    abstract int run(int iterations) throws Throwable;

    private BigDecimal time() {
        try {
            int nextI = 1;
            int i;
            long duration;
            do {
                i = nextI;
                long start = System.nanoTime();
                run(i);
                duration = System.nanoTime() - start;
                nextI = (i << 1) | 1; 
            } while (duration < 100000000 && nextI > 0);
            return new BigDecimal((duration) * 1000 / i).movePointLeft(3);
        } catch (Throwable e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }
    }   

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return name + "\t" + time() + " ns";
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Benchmark[] benchmarks = {
            new Benchmark("int multiplication") {
                @Override int run(int iterations) throws Throwable {
                    int x = 1;
                    for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
                        x *= 3;
                    }
                    return x;
                }
            },
            new Benchmark("short multiplication") {                   
                @Override int run(int iterations) throws Throwable {
                    short x = 0;
                    for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
                        x *= 3;
                    }
                    return x;
                }
            },
            new Benchmark("byte multiplication") {                   
                @Override int run(int iterations) throws Throwable {
                    byte x = 0;
                    for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
                        x *= 3;
                    }
                    return x;
                }
            },
            new Benchmark("int[] traversal") {                   
                @Override int run(int iterations) throws Throwable {
                    int[] x = new int[iterations];
                    for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
                        x[i] = i;
                    }
                    return x[x[0]];
                }
            },
            new Benchmark("short[] traversal") {                   
                @Override int run(int iterations) throws Throwable {
                    short[] x = new short[iterations];
                    for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
                        x[i] = (short) i;
                    }
                    return x[x[0]];
                }
            },
            new Benchmark("byte[] traversal") {                   
                @Override int run(int iterations) throws Throwable {
                    byte[] x = new byte[iterations];
                    for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
                        x[i] = (byte) i;
                    }
                    return x[x[0]];
                }
            },
        };
        for (Benchmark bm : benchmarks) {
            System.out.println(bm);
        }
    }
}

which prints on my somewhat old notebook:

int multiplication  1.530 ns
short multiplication    2.105 ns
byte multiplication 2.483 ns
int[] traversal 5.347 ns
short[] traversal   4.760 ns
byte[] traversal    2.064 ns

As you can see, the performance differences are quite minor. Optimizing algorithms is far more important than the choice of primitive type.

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Rather than saying "most notably when using arrays", I think it might be simpler to say that short and byte are more efficient when stored in arrays that are large enough to matter (the bigger the array, the bigger the efficiency difference; a byte[2] might be more or less efficient than an int[2], but not by enough to matter either way), but that individual values are more efficiently stored as int. –  supercat Jan 26 '13 at 21:43

byte is generally considered to be 8 bits. short is generally considered to be 16 bits.

In a "pure" environment, which isn't java as all implementation of bytes and longs, and shorts, and other fun things is generally hidden from you, byte makes better use of space.

However, your computer is probably not 8 bit, and it is probably not 16 bit. this means that to obtain 16 or 8 bits in particular, it would need to resort to "trickery" which wastes time in order to pretend that it has the ability to access those types when needed.

At this point, it depends on how hardware is implemented. However from I've been tought, the best speed is achieved from storing things in chunks which are comfortable for your CPU to use. A 64 bit processor likes dealing with 64 bit elements, and anything less than that often requires "engineering magic" to pretend that it likes dealing with them.

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2  
I'm not sure what you mean by "engineering magic"... most/all modern processors have fast instructions to load a byte and sign-extend it, to store one from a full-width register, and to do byte-width or short-width arithmetic in a portion of a full-width register. If you were right, it would make sense, where feasible, to replace all ints with longs on a 64-bit processor. –  Ed Staub Oct 18 '13 at 15:37
    
I can imagine that being true. I just remember that in the Motorola 68k simulator we used, most operations could work with 16 bit values while not with 32 bit nor 64 bit. I was thinking that this meant that systems had a preferred value size that it can fetch optimally. Although I can imagine that modern 64bit processors can fetch 8bit, 16 bit, 32bit, and 64bit with equal ease, in this case it is a nonissue. Thanks for pointing that out. –  Dmitry Nov 12 '13 at 19:09

Using byte instead of int can increase performance if you are using them in a huge amount. Here is an experiment:

import java.lang.management.*;

public class SpeedTest {

/** Get CPU time in nanoseconds. */
public static long getCpuTime() {
    ThreadMXBean bean = ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean();
    return bean.isCurrentThreadCpuTimeSupported() ? bean
            .getCurrentThreadCpuTime() : 0L;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    long durationTotal = 0;
    int numberOfTests=0;

    for (int j = 1; j < 51; j++) {
        long beforeTask = getCpuTime();
        // MEASURES THIS AREA------------------------------------------
        long x = 20000000;// 20 millions
        for (long i = 0; i < x; i++) {
                           TestClass s = new TestClass(); 

        }
        // MEASURES THIS AREA------------------------------------------
        long duration = getCpuTime() - beforeTask;
        System.out.println("TEST " + j + ": duration = " + duration + "ns = "
                + (int) duration / 1000000);
        durationTotal += duration;
        numberOfTests++;
    }
    double average = durationTotal/numberOfTests;
    System.out.println("-----------------------------------");
    System.out.println("Average Duration = " + average + " ns = "
            + (int)average / 1000000 +" ms (Approximately)");


}

}

This class tests the speed of creating a new TestClass. Each tests does it 20 million times and there are 50 tests.

Here is the TestClass:

 public class TestClass {
 int a1= 5;
 int a2= 5; 
 int a3= 5;
 int a4= 5; 
 int a5= 5;
 int a6= 5; 
 int a7= 5;
 int a8= 5; 
 int a9= 5;
 int a10= 5; 
 int a11= 5;
 int a12=5; 
 int a13= 5;
 int a14= 5; 

 }

I've run the SpeedTest class and in the end got this:

 Average Duration = 8.9625E8 ns = 896 ms (Approximately)

Now I'm changing the ints into bytes in the TestClass and running it again. Here is the result:

 Average Duration = 6.94375E8 ns = 694 ms (Approximately)

I believe this experiment shows that if you are instancing a huge amount of variables, using byte instead of int can increase efficiency

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The difference is hardly noticeable! It's more a question of design, appropriateness, uniformity, habit, etc... Sometimes it's just a matter of taste. When all you care about is that your program gets up and running and substituting a float for an int would not harm correctness, I see no advantage in going for one or another unless you can demonstrate that using either type alters performance. Tuning performance based on types that are different in 2 or 3 bytes is really the last thing you should care about; Donald Knuth once said: "Premature optimization is the root of all evil" (not sure it was him, edit if you have the answer).

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1  
Nit: A float cannot represent all integers an int can; nor can an int represent any non-integer value that float can. That is, while all int values are a subset of long values, an int is not a subset of a float and a float is not a subset of an int. –  user166390 Jan 25 '13 at 22:23
    
I expect the answerer meant to write substituting a float for a double, if so answerer should edit the answer. If not answerer should hang head in shame and go back to basics for reasons outlined by @pst and for many other reasons. –  High Performance Mark Jan 25 '13 at 22:56
    
@HighPerformanceMark No I put int and float because that's what I was thinking. My answer is not specific to Java although I was thinking C... It's meant to be general. Mean comment you got there. –  saadtaame Jan 25 '13 at 23:48

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