Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm learning Bash for a Unix class, and I'm trying to figure out how to run a script, then run a second script while the first is running and have the two interact. To clarify, the scripts look like this:

#!/bin/bash

num = 1
trap exit 0 SIGINT SIGTERM
trap "{ echo &num ; num++; }" SIGUSR1

while :
do
    sleep 2
done

and the second one:

#!/bin/bash

if ps | grep "$1" > /dev/null
then
    kill -SIGUSR1 $1
else
    echo "Process doesn't exist"
fi

exit 0

In case the code isn't correct, the general idea is for the first script to loop until it recieves a SIGINT or SIGTERM, and echo and increment a number whenever it receives a SIGUSR1. The second script takes a pid as an argument and checks if it exists, and sends a SIGUSR1 to the given process. The problem is that when I run the first script, I can't do anything unless I move it to the background with ctrl-z, but when it's there it doesn't seem to respond to any signal except a kill signal. Any ideas on how to make this work?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

You can use mycommand & to run a script in the background. Ctrl-Z stops the script, but you can then use bg to let it run in the background. In either case, you can use fg to bring it to the foreground again.

Also note that you can't have spaces around the = in assignments, and you can use let num++ to increment num. You should also singlequote the command in trap, to prevent "$num" from expanding.

All in all:

#!/bin/bash

num=1
trap exit 0 SIGINT SIGTERM
trap '{ echo $num ; let num++; }' SIGUSR1

while :
do
    sleep 2
done

Finally, you can more easily check if a pid exists by just using kill -0 pid, or just attempting to sigusr1 it and check the result, to avoid grep "123" matching the substring of pid "1234" and such.

share|improve this answer
    
Alright, thanks! The spaces in the num = 1 were actually typos from copying it over, and the directions on the assignment specified using ps and grep, presumably just for the sake of learning how to use them. –  Nathan Canning Jan 25 '13 at 23:04
add comment

You need to make the first script run in the background. When you press Ctrl+Z it is suspended. Then you can type "bg" to make it run in the background (it will stop again if it tries to read from standard input, to allow you to switch back to it with the "fg" command).

Another way is to start script1 already in the background like this:

$ ./script1 &

The ampersand starts a job in the background and returns you to the prompt immediately.

Look in the bash man page under "JOB CONTROL" (here's a copy) for more information on how this works. The key commands to deal with jobs from an interactive shell is "jobs", "fg", and "bg".

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.